Eric J. Greenberg

Remembering Barbie's Jewish Mother

05/03/2002
Staff Writer
Ruth Moskowitz was the youngest of 10 children born to Polish-Jewish immigrant parents Jacob and Ida. Little did they imagine that their baby daughter would grow up to create one of America's most popular icons. As the creator of the Barbie doll and co-founder of the Mattel Toy Corp., Ruth became one of the country's most enterprising and powerful businesswomen.

Feeling The Church's Pain

05/03/2002
Staff Writer
As the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops gets set to meet next month in Dallas to hammer out a policy on how to deal with priests who sexually abuse children, one Long Island rabbi is offering his help and empathy. "We in the Jewish community feel the pain of the Catholic Church," said Rabbi Jeffrey Salkin of The Community Synagogue in Port Washington, L.I., and a vice president of the Long Island Board of Rabbis.

Cooling The Campus Heat

05/10/2002
Staff Writer
New York University's Office of Student Life was the scene of a peace negotiation last week that Colin Powell can only dream about. On one side of Sally Arthur, assistant vice president for student life, sat two leaders of a pro-Israel Jewish student group called TorchPAC. On the other side sat two officials from the pro-Palestinian Arab Student Union, the largest Arab student group at the Greenwich Village institution.

On Campus In Europe: Anti-Semitism

05/17/2002
Staff Writer
Julian Voloj still can't quite believe the ugly new wave of anti-Jewish incidents in Europe. The 28-year-old chairman of the European Union of Jewish Students, a 200,000-member organization of 18- to 30-year-old European Jews, shakes his head as he ticks off a list of recent incidents at university campuses. In Southern France, youth hostels are reportedly refusing to take in Israeli students. His French chapter was the victim of a molotov cocktail; the office was badly damaged.

Pursuing Refugees' Paper Trail

Israel to renew effort to document Jewish assets taken or lost in Arab countries.

05/17/2002
Staff Writer
In 1969, Israel announced a major project to document the potential billions of dollars in lost property that belonged to the estimated 850,000 Jews who fled or were forced to leave their native Arab countries because of persecution after the creation of the Jewish state. But the project was quickly abandoned.

Hell No, He Won't Go

05/24/2002
Staff Writer
Things were getting worse for the Palestinians, Haggai Matar said earnestly. Innocents were being killed, beaten, starved and made homeless: all under the heel of the Israeli Defense Forces. Matar, 17, reed thin and red ponytailed, was outraged by Israel's growing military operations last summer. So with the intifada that began in September 2000 growing more violent and no end in sight to Israel's occupation, he took action.

Girding For Campus Battles In The Fall

05/31/2002
Staff Writer
Jerusalem: Sitting in a converted bomb shelter in the basement of the hotel at the Ramat Rachel Kibbutz here, about 40 American Jewish college students are sharing their anxiety. Like a group therapy session, they talk about their frustration, fear and anger over the recent rising levels of anti-Israel and anti-Jewish sentiments on their campuses by pro-Palestinian activists, as violence continues unabated in the Middle East.

Crash Course On Conflict

06/14/2002
Staff Writer
Jerusalem: Vicki Szenes, a shy 19-year-old with a dazzling smile, often could be seen in the background at the parties and religious celebrations sponsored by the new Hillel chapter at the State University of New York at Binghamton. But it wasn't until after Sept. 11 that the Yeshivah of Flatbush High School graduate and Staten Island native began to feel a pull to get more involved with Hillel, the foundation that encourages Jewish life at universities across the nation.

A New Yorker On Edge

06/14/2002
Staff Writer
Efrat, Israel: Standing at an empty bus stop on Hebron Road under a bright hot sun, an American traveler leaving Jerusalem for the West Bank community of Efrat suddenly feels his senses turned up a notch. Waiting for the 167 bus heading south, the traveler watches four Israeli soldiers at a makeshift military checkpoint stop taxis, passenger cars and commercial trucks, delaying the Friday "have to get home for Shabbat" rush hour traffic.

'Hard-Core' Hate On The Rise

06/14/2002
Staff Writer
'Hard-core" anti-Semitic attitudes have increased in the United States for the first time in 38 years, according to a new national survey released Tuesday by the Anti-Defamation League. The rise comes as anti-Semitic attitudes are increasing around the globe, particularly in the Muslim world and Europe, amid continuing violence between Israel and the Palestinians.
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