Eric Herschthal

Studying Hate

Indiana U. launches contemporary anti-Semitism center, the second major academic institution of its kind. Will politics compromise its mission?

02/11/2010
Staff Writer

In recent years, Jewish intellectuals have sometimes bemoaned the anti-Zionist views heard on college campuses, and among liberal intellectuals generally, but have failed to do much about it. But that may be changing.

Last month, the chair of the Jewish studies department at Indiana University in Bloomington, Alvin Rosenfeld, announced the foundation of the Institute for the Study of Contemporary Anti-Semitism. His goal is to study, in a dispassionate, scholarly way, what he thinks is just a new version of a very old kind of hate: anti-Semitism.

Professor Alvin Rosenfeld, who teaches Jewish studies at Indiana University.

Jewish Professor, Black Culture

01/26/2010
Staff Writer

About five years ago, Vincent Brown, a historian at Harvard, had to teach a seminar on the birth of black studies. Though the discipline has flourished since the 1960s, its origins were not well known, so Brown, an iPod-generation professor, thought a documentary on the topic might help. He was an amateur filmmaker himself, deft with a Camcorder, and figured he might try to make one on his own.

WEB EXCLUSIVE: Is Jay Michaelson's God Too Mushy?

10/20/2009
Staff Writer

In the 1990s, when baby boomers were taking heat for being soulless hedonists, concerned with nothing but their own wealth and well being, the poet Rodger Kamenetz published "The Jew in the Lotus." A travelogue by a lapsed Jew and boomer himself, Kamenetz told the story of his spiritual reawakening on a trip to meet the Dalai Lama.

The Seriously Funny Side Of The IDF

02/02/2010
Staff Writer

About 12 years ago, Joel Chasnoff had a personal crisis. Fresh out of the University of Pennsylvania, he had no idea what he wanted to do with his life. His father’s success as a doctor in Chicago made him insecure, feeling like he had too big a pair of shoes to fill. And his passions — acting, stand-up comedy — hardly promised a stable alternative. But Chasnoff did have a strong Jewish identity, the result of a day school education, and an especially romantic vision of Israelis.

Guardians Of The Documents

Israeli, Palestinian archivists honored,
accompanied by high-profile keynoters.

01/28/2010
Staff Writer

On the face it, the CUNY Award for Archivist of the Year doesn’t exactly grab one’s attention. But this year the award, given by the Scone Foundation, and held at the CUNY Graduate Center on 34th Street and Fifth Avenue on Monday night, came with some star power.

Columbia’s Rashid Khalidi, left, and UCLA’s David Myers: Championing the work of archivists, with a little politics thrown in.

Jewish Professor, Black Culture

Documentary chronicles the controversial ideas and internal conflicts of a
Northwestern University anthropologist who pioneered African-American studies.

01/28/2010
Staff Writer

About five years ago, Vincent Brown, a historian at Harvard, had to teach a seminar on the birth of black studies. Though the discipline has flourished since the 1960s, its origins were not well known, so Brown, an iPod-generation professor, thought a documentary on the topic might help. He was an amateur filmmaker himself, deft with a Camcorder, and figured he might try to make one on his own.

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36 Under 36 2009: Y-LOVE (Yitz Jordan), 31

Staff Writer
04/24/2009

 When you think of hip-hop and chasid, you probably think of Matisyahu, the bearded, Biblical spitting pop star. But it’s time to meet Y-Love, the black rapper from Brooklyn who converted to Judaism in 2001.

36 Under 36 2009: Michael Winograd, 26

Staff Writer
04/24/2009

There’s something distinctly retrograde about Michael Winograd, and it’s not just that he plays klezmer. It’s that he plays klezmer precisely how it was played 100 years ago. Unlike other popular musicians who’ve melded the music with more contemporary fare — the rapper SoCalled, the punk-slanted star Daniel Kahn — Winograd sticks to the genre’s roots. Now 26, he’s been playing the clarinet since he was 14 and first attended the renowned Catskill summit called KlezKamp.

36 Under 36 2009: Michael Winograd, 26

Staff Writer
04/24/2009

There’s something distinctly retrograde about Michael Winograd, and it’s not just that he plays klezmer. It’s that he plays klezmer precisely how it was played 100 years ago. Unlike other popular musicians who’ve melded the music with more contemporary fare — the rapper SoCalled, the punk-slanted star Daniel Kahn — Winograd sticks to the genre’s roots. Now 26, he’s been playing the clarinet since he was 14 and first attended the renowned Catskill summit called KlezKamp.

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