Doug Chandler

Q Train Case May Hinge On Eyewitness Testimony

12/19/2007
Special To The Jewish Week

The suspects charged in the Q train beating of three Jewish students celebrating Chanukah are guilty of “nothing more than acting as kids,” said Peter Mollo, the lawyer for one of them.

Mollo, whose comments drew harsh reaction from two local leaders, compared how authorities react to such behavior today and how they regarded it four decades ago, when he was a child growing up in Bay Ridge.

Despite Weak Markets, Gifts Stay Strong

12/12/2007
Special To The Jewish Week

Global financial markets are anticipating a downturn, the word “recession” is being whispered on Wall Street and, as a result, holiday bonuses at the large banks and investment houses may be considerably lower this year. But those worries failed to dampen last week’s Wall Street Dinner, the annual event organized by the Wall Street and Financial Services Division of UJA-Federation of New York.

This Doctor Sings To Her Patients

11/28/2007
Special To The Jewish Week

One of Jill Maura Rabin’s favorite stories concerns a recent visit to her office by a frail and shaken 93-year-old woman.

The woman had come to see Rabin, an obstetrician-gynecologist at Long Island Jewish Medical Center, because of pelvic-organ prolapse and incontinence, a related ailment that often sends women to nursing homes.

How Far Can Their Dialogue Go?

11/14/2007
Special To The Jewish Week

For several tense minutes last week, it seemed as if the first “National Summit of Imams and Rabbis” might fail even before it got off the ground.

Both participants and observers waited with bated breath as Sheik Omar Abu-Namous, one of the event’s organizers, called for an Israeli “apology” to the Palestinians, along with some form of compensation for families who lost their land in 1948, the year Israel was established.

All Eyes On Myanmar

10/11/2007
Special To The Jewish Week

As the military government in Myanmar continued its crackdown on pro-democracy activists, a Burmese Jew now living in the United States expressed his sorrow over the killing of civilians — a number that could be as low as the 10 acknowledged by the government or as high as the hundreds claimed by human-rights advocates.

Sammy Samuels, a New York-based employee of American Jewish Congress, also said he witnessed one of the largest demonstrations preceding the crackdown while visiting his family in Yangon, Myanmar’s capital, for the High Holy Days.

The Hero Of An Israeli Best Seller

09/20/2007
Special To The Jewish Week

When Ram Oren, the Israeli author likened by much of his country to John Grisham, learned of Michael Stolowitzky’s story, he was faced with a choice: He could turn the tale into a work of fiction, like 17 of his previous 20 books, or treat it as history.

But Oren found the choice surprisingly easy.

A Pioneer At 99

08/26/2007
Special To The Jewish Week

Her dream has been deferred — for a full half-century — but it hasn’t died. It has survived the Shoah, the squalid conditions for Jews on the run from the Nazis, of postwar Shanghai, and her husband’s desire to live in the States.

And now, 50 years after the idea first lodged itself in the mind, and in the heart, of Dina Noth, and more than a decade after her husband died, her dream is on the verge of coming true.

When Veterans Come Home

06/22/2007
Special To The Jewish Week

Much of the public thinks of a soldier’s return home as a joyous time for the veteran and his or her family, but the reality can be more complicated, said Jacob Remo, the commander of a Jewish War Veterans post near Boston and a member of JWV’s Health Initiatives Committee.

The transition from war to peace is often difficult as roles change within the family, as the soldier returns to work or looks for a new job and as civilian life begins anew, Remo said, adding that all members of the family feel the stress.

Moments Of Sadness Are Normal, But Don’t ‘Get Stuck’ In Them

Special To The Jewish Week
05/15/2009

Jonathan Katz, a social worker who has helped address the after-effects of the financial meltdown, says some people who’ve been hurt by the crisis fail to seek the help they need, either because they’re overwhelmed by emotion or because they’re embarrassed at having fallen.

But he likens such a response to that of the flood victim in an old, Jewish joke:

The Battle Of The Generations

12/24/2009
Staff Writer

It was billed as a dialogue between a young, anti-establishment figure, turned off by many of the Jewish community’s most venerable institutions, and the top executive of what’s arguably the community’s most established organization, UJA-Federation of New York.

But, at some points during the evening, it seemed as if their roles were reversed, with the young rebel coming across as the rugged individualist, resistant to any compromise, and the older speaker more of a collectivist, concerned about the common good.

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