David Saperstein

Orthodox Union Official: Don’t Exclude in the Name of Inclusion

06/28/2010
Special to the Jewish Week

WASHINGTON (JTA) -- Lynn Schusterman, a passionate and impactful philanthropic leader in the American Jewish community, has called upon Jewish organizations to adopt policies that will foster greater inclusion of gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgendered Jews in the community.

A WaPo editorial on Arizona immigration law echoes concerns of Jewish groups

 A strong editorial in today's Washington Post sheds some light on why a number of Jewish groups think Arizona's new illegal immigration law is stupid and dangerous.

The Post writes that the new law 'will turn immigrants who came here illegally into quarry for law enforcement agencies statewide,” and that it “twists the Constitution."

Liberal Jewish Groups Optimistic About Stevens’ Replacement

04/14/2010
JTA

WASHINGTON (JTA) -- The Jewish groups who liked John Paul Stevens as a Supreme Court justice are getting ready to dish out the same like to whomever replaces him.

Most of the Jewish groups closely tracking court decisions favor Stevens' liberal record, with minor qualifications, and do not believe that President Obama will choose a replacement who deviates from the norm.

Drill, Baby, Drill: The (barely audible) Jewish response

The Reform movement, which really wants to like President Barack Obama even while some other Jewish segments bash him because of the diplomatic chill with Israel, isn't exactly happy with his newly announced energy policies, which some environmentalists say could turn East Coast beaches into a gooey mess and actually forestall genuine energy independence.

Jewish Groups Praise Health Care Reform Bill's Passage

Jewish Republicans: plan will "worsen our already dire fiscal situation"

03/22/2010

NEW YORK (JTA) -- Jewish groups are lauding the U.S. Congress' passage of a health care reform bill.

On Monday, the morning after the House of Representatives passed a measure that would create sweeping change in the way health care is provided in the United States, a slew of Jewish groups issued statements in support and looking forward to its signature into law by President Obama.

B’nai B’rith International was among the groups hailing the bill's passage.

All Eyes On Myanmar

10/11/2007
Special To The Jewish Week

As the military government in Myanmar continued its crackdown on pro-democracy activists, a Burmese Jew now living in the United States expressed his sorrow over the killing of civilians — a number that could be as low as the 10 acknowledged by the government or as high as the hundreds claimed by human-rights advocates.

Sammy Samuels, a New York-based employee of American Jewish Congress, also said he witnessed one of the largest demonstrations preceding the crackdown while visiting his family in Yangon, Myanmar’s capital, for the High Holy Days.

Blogging the New Israel Fund flap

The reaction against attempts by the political right in Israel to portray the New Israel Fund as a  kind of anti-Israel fifth column is intensifying.

Vatican Rep Accuses Israel Of 'Blood Libel,' Harsh Exchange Seen As Major Interfaith Setback

07/23/1999
Staff Writer
A Vatican representative accused Israel of a "blood libel" against a World War II-era pope, and blamed the Jewish state for mounting tensions between Jews and the Catholic Church, shocking an audience at a conference on anti-Semitism in Tel Aviv, and prompting interfaith leaders to say severe damage has been done to the Jewish-Catholic dialogue. Rev.

Manners And Morals

01/15/1999
Staff Writer
The new year is bringing with it a slew of new interfaith news and events. Perhaps the most critical issue involves the nasty political environment in Washington, D.C., and the Senate impeachment trial of President Clinton. A coalition of Christian, Muslim and Jewish religious leaders are strongly criticizing what they say is the deplorable lack of political civility in the nation's capitol and on television and radio talks shows.

Reclaiming Heschel

01/09/1998
Staff Writer
He was accused of being too political. Others said he was too spiritual. Certainly he melded the ancient wisdom of the prophets with a modern sensibility to become the symbol of Jewish social action in America during the turbulent 1960s. When Abraham Joshua Heschel barely escaped Nazi Europe in 1940, the 33-year-old scholar began teaching at Hebrew Union College in Cincinnati. There he found himself disregarded as a chasidic traditionalist out of step with the Reform movement’s modern, non-observant world.
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