David

Shavuot: Cracked Eggs, A Gradual Convert And A Supportive Jewish Mother-in-Law

Last night, in anticipation of Shavuot, which starts Tuesday night, my daughters and I made noodle kugel.

Yes, I know blintzes and cheesecake are more typical fare for this holiday commemorating the giving of the Torah, but noodle pudding shares their status as dairy-laden traditional Jewish food — and it’s considerably easier to prepare.

Reasons To Root: The Mets Stood Up Against Arab Pressure

Here's one big Zionist reason to root for the New York Mets.

Last November 21, the Hebron Fund booked a reception room in the Met's stadium for a fundraising dinner. The fund supports a Jewish presence in Judaism's second holiest city, site of the Machpela (tomb of Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, Sarah, Rebecca and Leah, and some say Adam and Eve) and King David's one-time capital. The Machpela is to Jews what the Lincoln Memorial is to Americans, except Lincoln isn't buried there but Abraham is.

At Last, A Final Chapter For Milton Steinberg

Sixty years after the rabbi’s death, a novel thought to be ‘too hot to handle’ for its tale
of the Prophet Hosea and his prostitute wife, is published.

03/18/2010
Special To The Jewish Week

 

 
When Rabbi Milton Steinberg died suddenly and tragically in 1950 at the age of 46, there was a keen awareness that the Jewish community had lost one of its great literary, intellectual and spiritual voices. Steinberg was a preacher of uncommon eloquence and depth, a literary craftsman of prodigious output, and a scholar at home with both rabbinic and classic literature.
 

Rabbi Steinberg at work. Rabbi Elliott Cosgrove offers a reader’s guide to “The Prophet’s Wife”.

Can You Get There from Here? A Jerusalem Story

05/06/2008
Special to the Jewish Week

As I write this blog, President Bush is making his way to Jerusalem (where I am), to participate in Israeli President Shimon Peres’ “Conference on Tomorrow.” The conference itself is quite amazing. Just this afternoon, Tony Blair chaired a session on visions of the future with Mikhail Gorbachev and some nineteen other heads of state in attendance (all in celebration of Israel’s 60th!). It was heady stuff! And tomorrow, out of the blue of the western sky (let’s see who gets that reference!), comes our own President to join the festivities.

Classic Sites To See - Again

Special To The Jewish Week
10/27/2009
A tourist’s first visit to Israel typically has a predictable itinerary: the Western Wall, Masada, Tel Aviv. Return visitors are often keen to experience different sites, ones they missed the first time. But in the last five years, a wide range of attractions all over Israel have undergone such extensive renovation or expansion that they are worth a repeat visit.

Art Of The Deal

03/12/2008
Staff Writer
Jerry Cahn, a professor of strategic management at Baruch College, is also a serial entrepreneur. The Upper West Sider, whose varied career includes work on Capitol Hill and a stint as director of research and evaluation at Planned Parenthood, has launched three companies with the same name: Brilliant Image. He sold the first, a presentation graphics company, in 1999 to C2Media. The second, which he later renamed Target 3 Communications, is a branding, investor/public relations and marketing communications firm.      

First Temple Fireworks

01/24/2003
Staff Writer
He was no King David. But biblical King Joash has suddenly been thrust into the international limelight. Joash, who ruled the Kingdom of Judah for about 40 years (835-793 BCE), is linked to a fascinating debate over the authenticity of a 2,800-year-old stone tablet that bears his name. The black sandstone tablet would be the most spectacular (and virtually only) archaeological find linked to the First Temple: coming at a time when some Arab Muslim leaders claim the two Jerusalem Temples never existed on the Temple Mount.

Portrait Of An Accused Jewish Terrorist As A Young Man

American-born settler Jack Tytell is charged with multiple murders and hate crimes. A look into his upbringing in the U.S. reveals some surprises.

12/02/2009
Special to the Jewish Week

His fellow students at Akiva Hebrew Day School, a Modern Orthodox yeshiva in the Detroit suburb of Southfield, Mich., had Jack Tytell pegged.

He was “creepy,” one remembered, someone with “crazy eyes.” Another recalled Tytell walking through Akiva’s halls acting out imaginary combat scenes and jumping over tripwires that existed in his head only.

As their “Last Will and Testament” in the Akiva Class of ’90 yearbook, his classmates left him an “Uzi and a grenade ... and a Valium.” 

terrorist.gif

Rabbi Seymour Fox, Conservative Educator, 77

07/21/2006
Staff Writer
Rabbi Seymour Fox, a prominent Jewish educator in the United States and Israel for a half-century, died of heart failure July 10 in his Jerusalem home, two weeks after announcing his plans to retire from administration and return to teaching. He was 77. Known in Israel by his Hebrew name, Shlomo, he had served with the educational Mandel Foundation at the time of his death. A prolific author, he was known as an inspirational teacher and manager.

Profiling The Players

08/13/2004
Staff Writer
Many profiles of prominent athletes feature their “p.r.” That stands for personal record, the competitor’s best-ever performance in his or her sport, not for personal religion. So it’s often difficult to determine the religion of an athlete. In this issue and next week’s, The Jewish Week highlights some members of the U.S. Summer Olympics squad competing in Athens who are known to be members of the Jewish community.
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