Danny Levine

Spiritual Investments

04/03/2009
Staff Writer
At West Side Judaica, seder plates are the hot item these days. A little south, at Manhattan Judaica, a new Haggadah by the late philosophical leader of the Modern Orthodox movement is a best-seller. Further south, at J. Levine Books & Judaica, novelty items like a Pharaoh punching bag and a where-did-the-wine-go? Elijah’s Cup are popular. In this national time of recession, in the Jewish period before Passover, business is off for many merchants – but it’s not as off as expected for businesses selling goods for Pesach.

Gays Rituals Going Mainstream

08/01/2003
Staff Writer
Sarah and Michelle aren't getting married this summer; they're having a commitment ceremony. They are specifically not calling it a wedding and there will be no ketubah, marriage contract. Instead, they will participate in a Talmudic ritual that establishes business partnerships and outline their mutual responsibilities and commitment in a shtar, a Jewish legal document.

Spiritual Investments

04/01/2009
Staff Writer
At West Side Judaica, seder plates are the hot item these days. A little south, at Manhattan Judaica, a new Haggadah by the late philosophical leader of the Modern Orthodox movement is a best-seller. Further south, at J. Levine Books & Judaica, novelty items like a Pharaoh punching bag and a where-did-the-wine-go? Elijah’s Cup are popular. In this national time of recession, in the Jewish period before Passover, business is off for many merchants – but it’s not as off as expected for businesses selling goods for Pesach.

New Broth

05/16/2003
Staff Writer
A middle-aged woman walked into J. Levine Judaica, a Midtown bookstore, one recent afternoon, looking for an inspirational gift for a friend with cancer. Owner Danny Levine pointed her to the self-help section. The customer chose one of the "Small Miracles" books, with many Jewish stories, by Brooklyn authors Yitta Halberstam and Judith Leventhal. The woman said someone profiled in one of the books reminded her of her friend. The woman, Levine says, spent "a good 15, 20 minutes" reading many stories in many books.

On The Same Page

02/25/2005
Staff Writer
Several dozen times over the past seven years, the Levine family of Greenwich Village has invited a few friends to a private celebration in a kosher restaurant. Each meal was a siyum, marking the completion of a tractate of Talmud studied by Danny Levine and his two teenage sons. “Usually about eight or nine” people came, Levine said. Tuesday will be the Levine family’s final siyum, but a restaurant couldn’t hold everyone coming.
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