Daniel Gordis

Beinart's Jews: Fries, Jam & Chocolate for Hamas, Not One Word For Shalit

We've established previously that Peter Beinart lied about Netanyahu not supporting the Oslo accords, when he did support the Oslo accords, and that Beinart, when not lying is distorting, such as claiming that Netanyahu opposed a Palestinian state -- which he did oppose in 1993, without Beinart adding  the all-important fact that Netanyahu supports a Palestinian state today.

Beinart & Other Voices

One leftist Jewish blogger at a Jewish newspaper wrote, "I will be honest with you: I myself knew little about the specfics of Jerusalem's modern history until this spat," between the U.S. and Israel earlier in the spring, but he'll tell you his opinion anyway. Such is the state of modern Jewish journalism. Knowledge is nothing. Opinion is everything. Step right up, you don't need to know anything to play.

Parenting & The New Spirituality

06/28/2000
Staff Writer
We’ve traveled a long way from the old country, where Jewish life was absorbed by people growing up in their parents’ homes, traditions passed down from one generation to the next naturally, transmitted almost by osmosis in the shtetl square. Fast forward to modern America, circa 2000, and the reality is that many of us were raised by parents who emphasized the American part of being American Jews and let the Jewish piece fall by the wayside.

In The Bat Mitzvah Spirit

06/17/2005
Staff Writer
Among the concerns for the Lippmans of the Upper East Side in planning their daughter Juliet's bat mitzvah last fall was how to give the occasion some spiritual significance. "What should we do so it's not just a party?" Marie Lippman asked a friend, Rabbi Adina Lewittes of Tenafly, N.J., over lunch at a Midtown restaurant a few months before the bat mitzvah. Rabbi Lewittes answered by telling a story she had just read in Rabbi Daniel Gordis' on-line column from Israel.

In The Bat Mitzvah Spirit

06/17/2005
Staff Writer
Among the concerns for the Lippmans of the Upper East Side in planning their daughter Juliet's bat mitzvah last fall was how to give the occasion some spiritual significance. "What should we do so it's not just a party?" Marie Lippman asked a friend, Rabbi Adina Lewittes of Tenafly, N.J., over lunch at a Midtown restaurant a few months before the bat mitzvah. Rabbi Lewittes answered by telling a story she had just read in Rabbi Daniel Gordis' on-line column from Israel.
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