Carolyn Slutsky

36 Under 36 2009: Taylor Krauss, 29

Staff Writer
04/24/2009

 It was his connection to the Holocaust that led Taylor Krauss to live halfway around the world in Rwanda. As a film student at Yale University, Krauss had visited the Fortunoff Video Archive of Holocaust Testimonies, which started collecting survivor testimonies in 1982, and remembered the stories he’d heard later when he was in Rwanda working on a documentary.

36 Under 36 2009: Seth and Isaac Galena, 31

Staff Writer
04/24/2009

Seth and Isaac Galena have been a two-man comedy team ever since the womb. Shortly after they graduated from Yeshiva University, the twin brothers started a Web site, bangitout.com, which quickly morphed from daily jokes that tipped their hats to Jewish life to a clearinghouse for apartments, jobs and other connections and resonated strongly with their modern Orthodox peers on Manhattan’s Upper West Side.

"Now it’s kind of a brand, and it’s pretty cool to establish a brand," says Seth (on right), whose day job is in advertising.

36 Under 36 2009: Rabbi Yehuda Sarna, 30

Staff Writer
04/24/2009

Watching him in the kosher café at NYU, his BlackBerry on the table while he talks with a student, you would be forgiven for mistaking Rabbi Yehuda Sarna for an undergraduate himself. But Rabbi Sarna has served as the rabbi for the Bronfman Center for Jewish Student Life at NYU since 2002, also founding the Jewish Learning Initiative on campus in 2005, building a reputation for engaging Jewish students in creative ways and for encouraging interreligious dialogue, especially through his close friendship with NYU Imam Khalid Latif.

36 Under 36 2009: Michelle Citrin, 28

Staff Writer
04/24/2009

After college she started touring as a musician, and she visited Israel on a Birthright trip, which she credits for the Jewish themes that began to seep into her folk music. Back in America and on the road, she visited places like Nebraska and South Dakota, where many people had never met Jews. "People gasped when I said I was Jewish; they were looking for the horns," she says. Ultimately, though, she was happy to be open about her Judaism: "I was a reference point for people, and I welcomed it."

36 Under 36 2009: Joshua Ellison, 31

Staff Writer
04/24/2009

Joshua Ellison spent a year in Israel, he became immersed in Israeli culture and society. But his trip, through the DOROT Fellowship in Israel, also prompted explorations farther afield than the Jewish state, landing him first in Budapest, and later beyond. "I tried to make sense of the experience of living in Israel and I went to Budapest and something really clicked, very much something Jewish," he says. "The more I traveled the more I had those experiences."

36 Under 36 2009: Beejhy Barhany, 33

Staff Writer
04/24/2009

 By the time she was 7, Beejhy Barhany had fled her native Ethiopia, walking with her family and 300 villagers to Sudan, where they started a new life. After a few years they left again, this time taking a Jeep through the jungles of Kenya, on to Uganda, France and finally to Israel, which even at that young age she remembers was "like fulfilling a dream after exile."

What’s New At The Seminaries?

Staff Writer
01/16/2009
Yeshiva University this year launched a new program, the Institute for University-School Partnership at YU’s Azrieli Graduate School of Jewish Education and Administration.

The Starbucks Rebbe

Staff Writer
01/16/2009
At Francis Lewis High School on Utopia Parkway in Flushing, Queens, the hallways ring with calls of “L’Chaims” and “Mazel Tov” from the jean-clad, largely non-Jewish teenagers watching as Rabbi Steven Burg, dressed in a suit and a yarmulke, ambles along with his rabbinic colleagues carrying pizza, donuts and Coke. Together the rabbis enter a classroom, bearing food and Jewish lessons for a meeting of the Jewish Student Union, a national project that hopes to bring a measure of Judaism to unaffiliated students in public schools.

The Starbucks Rebbe

Staff Writer
01/16/2009
At Francis Lewis High School on Utopia Parkway in Flushing, Queens, the hallways ring with calls of “L’Chaims” and “Mazel Tov” from the jean-clad, largely non-Jewish teenagers watching as Rabbi Steven Burg, dressed in a suit and a yarmulke, ambles along with his rabbinic colleagues carrying pizza, donuts and Coke. Together the rabbis enter a classroom, bearing food and Jewish lessons for a meeting of the Jewish Student Union, a national project that hopes to bring a measure of Judaism to unaffiliated students in public schools.

A Brooklyn Brew Of Jewish And Montessori

Staff Writer
01/16/2009
Deep in the bowels of a Prospect Heights apartment building that looks just like any other in this trendy neighborhood, down a long, winding hallway flanked on either side with burnished doors, 30 young children spend their days learning how to learn.
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