Brian Burstin

Shul Fracas In The East Village

An almost 100-year-old synagogue is being sold to developers, but some congregants claim the vote wasn’t legal.

08/15/2008
Staff Writer

At 7:20 p.m. on a recent Monday, only nine people had shown up for the 7:15 Mincha service at Anshei Meseritz synagogue, a crumbling relic from the turn of the last century that sits directly across the street from the Village View public housing project in Lower Manhattan. Past the sheaths of peeling gray paint and decaying stained glass Stars of David, the shul’s inside houses dysfunctional toilets that are said to be more frequently visited by rats than humans.
 

Anshei Meseritz on East 6th Street. Sharon Udasin

WEB EXCLUSIVE: Fracas In The East Village

08/06/2008
Staff Writer
At 7:20 p.m. on Monday, only nine people had shown up for the 7:15 Mincha service at Anshei Meseritz synagogue, a crumbling relic from the turn of the last century that sits directly across the street from the Village View public housing project in Lower Manhattan. Past the sheaths of peeling gray paint and decaying stained glass Stars of David, the shul’s inside houses dysfunctional toilets are said to be more frequently visited by rats than humans.

Flatbush Holy War

09/27/2002
Staff Writer
Brian Burstin has been praying at Congregation Talmud Torah of Flatbush in Brooklyn since 1967, when he was 11. Before that, his parents were members at the stately yellow brick Modern Orthodox synagogue on Coney Island Avenue, near the busy Avenue J kosher shopping strip in the Midwood section. The shul's late Rabbi Leo Landman, one of only three spiritual leaders in the synagogue's 80-year-history, performed Burstin's wedding.

Shul Demolition May Go Through

01/24/2003
Staff Writer
A 150-year-old Brooklyn Orthodox synagogue, Congregation Tifereth Israel, could be demolished as early as next week in the midst of a nasty legal dispute between two factions over the sale of their spiritual home in Williamsburg. "The intention is to demolish it," said attorney Franklyn Snitow, who is representing a group of shul officers who sold the one-story building on Bedford Avenue to a neighborhood congregation, Adas Yereim, for $850,000 in 2000.

Shul Keeps Its Spirit

11/01/2002
Staff Writer
Stanton Street Synagogue lives. A small band of worshipers last week secured the right to keep their Lower East Side shul months after their elderly rabbi tried to secretly sell the building to a Jesuit priest. “I think it’s a victory for the Jewish people,” declared congregant Iris Blutreich, who helped lead the bitter two-year battle to save the 90-year-old synagogue. “If we don’t have synagogues, how can we have peoplehood?”
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