Brad Hirschfield

The Stupid Things We Say

I was once discussing a home improvement project with a potential contractor, when a date to start the job came up and I mentioned that it was Martin Luther King Day.

The contractor, who is white, then repeated the name of the holiday in an exasperated voice, and added “What will they think of next?”

In one small utterance, this man had given me a window into his soul, and it wasn’t pretty.

Celebrating Jewish American Heritage with President Obama and Sandy Koufax

06/03/2010
Special to the Jewish Week

My recent visit to the White House was a moving experience, and not simply because it was the White House, though one has to be pretty cynical not to be moved by that alone. I was there with a group of about 150 others, including Hall-of-Famer, Sandy Koufax, who were invited by President and Mrs. Obama to join them in the first-ever White House celebration of Jewish American Heritage month.

Rabbi Brad Hirschfield

Who Gets Religious Custody in an Interfaith Divorce?

04/20/2010
Special to the Jewish Week

The case of little Ela Reyes raises many thorny issues about church/state entanglement, parenting in a multicultural world, and the challenge of religious pluralism. Ela’s parents, Rebecca Reyes (born Jewish) and her now ex-husband Joseph Reyes (raised Catholic, converted to Judaism, and now returning to the Church) found themselves in court over the issue of his right to bring Ela to church. Cook County (Illinois) Judge Renee Goldfarb ruled that Mr. Reyes has the right to do so. 

Unlock The Doors Of Cynicism This Pesach

03/23/2010
Special To The Jewish Week

On Monday night Jewish children all over the world will open their Haggadahs and ask “why is this night different from all other nights?” This classic inquiry focuses on how the seder meal differs from all other festive family dinners. But how it does so is not the only question upon which to focus at the seder. 
 

An Arena For Forgiveness?

09/19/2008
Staff Writer
A major German company cooperates with the Third Reich during World War II. Years later, it apologizes for its actions and makes reparation payments to Holocaust survivors. The firm is honored in the United States by the Jewish community. Another major German company cooperates with the Third Reich. It also apologizes and makes reparation payments. In an attempt to strengthen its public image in the U.S., it bids to put its name on a prominent football stadium. The firm is heavily criticized here by the Jewish community.

An Arena For Forgiveness?

09/17/2008
Staff Writer
A major German company cooperates with the Third Reich during World War II. Years later, it apologizes for its actions and makes reparation payments to Holocaust survivors. The firm is honored in the United States by the Jewish community. Another major German company cooperates with the Third Reich. It also apologizes and makes reparation payments. In an attempt to strengthen its public image in the U.S., it bids to put its name on a prominent football stadium. The firm is heavily criticized here by the Jewish community.

'McLaughlin' Meets 'God Squad'

11/10/2006
Staff Writer
Rabbi Brad Hirschfield, a longtime executive at CLAL-The National Jewish Center for Learning and Leadership and veteran of interfaith activities, received an unexpected call a year and a half ago from a Buffalo-based Islamic cable television channel. Bridges TV wanted him to host a Jewish-Islamic-Christian talk show.

'McLaughlin' Meets 'God Squad'

11/10/2006
Staff Writer
Rabbi Brad Hirschfield, a longtime executive at CLAL-The National Jewish Center for Learning and Leadership and veteran of interfaith activities, received an unexpected call a year and a half ago from a Buffalo-based Islamic cable television channel. Bridges TV wanted him to host a Jewish-Islamic-Christian talk show.

The ‘Ark’ Of Current Events

06/29/2007
Associate Editor

Biblical Hollywood has evolved through the decades, from sex-and-sandal epics, to Cecil B.

A Jewish Space In Auschwitz

09/22/2000
Staff Writer
Brad Hirschfield, an Orthodox rabbi, couldn’t make himself recite Mincha, the afternoon prayer service, one afternoon last week. He had just left Auschwitz. Rabbi Hirschfield, director of educational programs at CLAL-The National Jewish Center for Learning and Leadership, was part of a 50-member American delegation that visited Poland for the dedication of a renovated synagogue in Oswiecim, the town where the death camp was located.
Syndicate content