Beth El

Jews, Muslims Cook Up Peace

Interfaith women’s event
an exchange of food, stories and experiences.

06/08/2010
Special To The Jewish Week

Breaking bread together, literally, helped launch conversations between some of the county’s Muslims and Jews.

In mid-April, several women from the local American Women’s Muslim Association along with several women from Westchester’s Jewish community, gathered at Hartsdale’s Chef Central to share such dishes as biryani, baba ghanoush, kasha varnishkes and noodle kugel.

Jewish and Muslim women cook together in coexistence effort at Chef Central in Hartsdale.

Is it OK to Hide a Fugitive From the Police?

06/07/2010
Special to the Jewish Week

Q: You are out for a walk one night and you see a man running towards you. He looks terrified, stressed and panicked. He comes up to you with tears in his eyes and says, “I am going to hide right here. I can’t run anymore. I didn’t do anything wrong. Please, promise me you won’t tell them where I am!”

So you promise the man, he hides behind a bush and you keep walking.

Rabbi Joshua Hammerman

Trope Tools - Learn to Read Torah on the iPad

Rabbi Eli Garfinkel, rabbi of Temple Beth El in Somerset, New Jersey and the techie behind the award-winning RabbiPod, has created his first app for the iPhone, iPod Touch and iPad family of Apple devices.

Trope Tools iPad App

Revival By The Sea

07/30/2004
Staff Writer

In 2000 Rabbi Shohama Wiener was invited to lead High Holy Days services at Kona Beth Shalom, a synagogue on the Big Island of Hawaii, where the congregation’s greeting of choice is “Shaloha.” When she wasn’t conducting services or polishing her sermons, the rabbi swam and snorkeled alongside congregants in the nearby Pacific Ocean.

Keeping The Faith On The Great Plains

04/29/2005
Managing Editor

Fargo, N.D. — The pioneer Jews who homesteaded on the flat, wind-whipped high plains at the turn of the last century came from foreign lands, beat back bone-rattling prairie winters and eked out a community in hardscrabble farming colonies near here.

They would have recognized a kindred spirit in Biana Shilshtut.A pioneer in her own right, Shilshtut came to North Dakota State University two years ago from half a world away in Tashkent, Uzbekistan, the capital city in the foothills of the mountains of Central Asia.

Keeping The Faith On The Great Plains

04/29/2005
Managing Editor

Fargo, N.D. — The pioneer Jews who homesteaded on the flat, wind-whipped high plains at the turn of the last century came from foreign lands, beat back bone-rattling prairie winters and eked out a community in hardscrabble farming colonies near here.

They would have recognized a kindred spirit in Biana Shilshtut.

A pioneer in her own right, Shilshtut came to North Dakota State University two years ago from half a world away in Tashkent, Uzbekistan, the capital city in the foothills of the mountains of Central Asia.

Lancaster's Jews Open Their Hearts To Amish

10/13/2006
Special To The Jewish Week

For Lisa Wright, one of the few Jews of Lancaster County to live in a rural area with Amish neighbors, what stands out about the past two weeks are mostly the contrasts.

‘Curating Lives’

Special To The Jewish Week
11/17/2009
Ilana Segal loves stories and the process of uncovering them, which is why she worked as a curator for many years, examining and unearthing the tales behind objects for New York’s Central Synagogue, the library at the Jewish Theological Seminary and North Suburban Synagogue Beth El in Chicago. “I love pulling out the stories of lives, people and places,” she said. “I’m driven by the rich stories that lay hidden in objects, and doing the right research to expand those stories.”

‘People Have Turned Away From Us’

08/27/1999
Staff Writer
Synagogue officials across the country this week struggled with how to handle security arrangements for the High Holy Days, while bizarre bias acts occurred at two synagogues in Connecticut and in Brooklyn. Meanwhile, two weeks after a white supremacist gunman went on a shooting rampage at Los Angeles Jewish Community Center wounding five people, including three children, JCC officials are issuing a plea for help, saying they are feeling abandoned by the Jewish community.

Should Mrs. Madoff have reported Bernie?

What does Jewish law say about her responsibility to snitch?

11/23/2009
Special to the Jewish Week

Question: Should Mrs. Madoff have reported Bernie? What does Jewish law say about her obligations?

Let's assume for the sake of argument that Ruth knew about the Ponzi scheme and that Bernie's crimes were committed while of sound mind and body. From the public record there is little information about Bernie's mental state - aside from indications he is a grade-A sociopath, of course.

So should Ruth have blown the whistle on Bernie? By all means.

Family loyalty cuts deep in Jewish tradition, but not that deep.

Rabbi Joshua Hammerman
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