Benjamin Netanyahu

No Netanyahu at Nuke Summit

A few weeks ago, I was wondering what was going through Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's head when he decided to attend next week's nuclear summit in Washington, where representatives of 47 countries, including many of heads of state, will gather to talk about nuclear terror, and in the process produce what local officials say will be some record-breaking traffic gridlock.

Time For Netanyahu To Be Creative

04/07/2010
Special To The Jewish Week

Golda Meir had a technique for fundraising in Israel. Gather a hundred of the wealthiest people in the community, she advised, and lock them in a room until each pledges a designated sum. Tell them that if anyone refuses to contribute, that person’s name and refusal will be spread around town.

Nobody turned her down.

A Week of Activism

With their own counter events, rallies and even popcorn,
pro-Israel students made sure Israeli Apartheid Week didn’t dominate campus discourse.

03/13/2009
Editorial Intern

Last Wednesday, approximately 70 New York University students viewed “The Impact of Occupation: This Body is a Prison,” as part of Israeli Apartheid Week.
While they watched the film, which is highly critical of Israeli policies in the occupied West Bank, many in the audience noshed on popcorn from cups plastered with pro-Israel messages.

NYU students braved the cold last week to show their support for Israel during a week of Palestinian protests.

AIPAC letter reveals: Obama Israel policies making House members nervous

 So AIPAC has convinced some 327 members of the House of Representatives to sign a letter essentially telling the Obama administration to keep its criticisms of the Israeli government private.

Mazel tov; that's an impressive achievement for the pro-Israel lobby group, although it probably didn't take much arm twisting; there's a lot of unease on Capitol Hill about where this administration's Mideast policy is headed.

Enemies Of The State

Israelis fear ‘Obama’s intifada,’ return of the bad days.

03/31/2010
Associate Editor

Death is closing in. Jerusalem is ready to blow. A genocidal bomb is being built in Iran, and an intifada is brewing at home. My Jerusalem feels “like a war zone,” writes Yossi Klein Halevi in The New Republic (March 16). There “are clusters of helmeted border police near the gates of the Old City, black smoke from burning tires in the Arab village across from my porch, young men marching with green Islamist flags toward my neighborhood, ambulances parked at strategic places ready for this city’s ultimate nightmare.” Some are calling it the Obama intifada.

March On Washington Seen If U.S.-Israeli Crisis Continues

ADL's Foxman suggests event as Israeli government digs in over Obama demands.

03/29/2010

Tel Aviv - American Jews should consider a march on Washington unless the "crisis" in the U.S.-Israel relationship is resolved soon, according to Abraham Foxman, national director of the Anti-Defamation League.

He observed that there is a "debate in the American Jewish community" about the best way to achieve Arab-Israeli peace and that such a march in the nation's capital would demonstrate where the American Jewish community lines up on this issue.

Obama administration policies are creating anxiety among Jewish leaders.

No Resolution to U.S.-Israel Tensions

03/29/2010
JTA

WASHINGTON (JTA) -- For Benjamin Netanyahu, the formula for resolving U.S.-Israeli tensions came in the form of a flow chart.

The Israeli prime minister took the chart with him when he met with Obama administration officials and visited the White House last week, two weeks after Israel angered the U.S. administration by announcing plans for 1,600 new housing units in a Jewish neighborhood of eastern Jerusalem during a visit to Israel by Vice President Joe Biden.

Obama, Netanyahu Reportedly Still at Odds

No joint statement issued after White House meetings

03/25/2010

WASHINGTON (JTA) -- Though Israel's prime minister said progress was made in resolving the current diplomatic crisis with the United States during his visit, the Obama administration does not appear to be satisfied.

"We are trying to find the golden path between our will to advance the peace process along with the United States and between maintaining the standard policy of all Israeli governments," Netanyahu said before boarding a plane for his return trip to Israel early Thursday morning.

Bibi, Barack and the Big Chill

 Okay, I confess, I missed the AIPAC policy conference this week, the first I haven't attended as a reporter in 23 years. But it's okay, I had a note from my editor because I was working on the new Jewish Week Web site, which you're now reading and I hope you're liking.

But you didn't need to be on the floor of the Washington Convention Center to know there's something afoot in the U.S.-ISrael relationship that worries the leaders of mainstream pro-ISrael groups and has given new hope to groups that favor a more robust U.S. peacemaking effort in the region.

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