Benjamin Netanyahu

AIPAC Could Face First Test In Decades

 AIPAC’s relationship with the Obama administration hinges on the policies of Bibi Netanyahu

04/29/2003
Washington Correspondent

The American Israel Public Affairs Committee (AIPAC), which holds its annual policy conference in Washington next week, could face its toughest battle with an administration in more than a decade, depending on the proposals Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu brings to Washington later in May.

Bibi, Biden Lay Down Markers At AIPAC

Netanyahu speech could be dry run for meeting with Obama

05/06/2009
Washington correspondent

In a speech that could be a dry run for his upcoming meetings with President Barack Obama, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu on Monday said his government is ready to “resume peace negotiations” with the Palestinians “without any delay, without any preconditions, the sooner the better” and called for a “triple-track” approach that includes political as well as economic and security negotiations.

The Bibi-Obama Friction Watch

 More is at stake in D.C. meeting for Netanyahu than for Obama, observers say.

05/13/2009
Washington Correspondent

The smart money (is there such a thing when it comes to American presidents and Israeli prime ministers?) says, No friction.

The atmospherics (the Israeli prime minister won’t utter the words “two-state solution” and his foreign minister wants to ignore prior accords, while the American president wants an end to settlement building) say, Friction galore.

Obama’s New Iran Timeline Could Force A U.S.-Israel Divide

Obama’s Iran deadline bought some time in his relationship with Israel and its leader, Benjamin Netanyahu.

05/20/2009
Washington Correspondent

While President Obama met Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu halfway on the volatile issue of Iran during their inaugural meeting in Washington this week, gaps between the two allies on the issue remain wide — and could get wider still as the administration begins dealing with a palate of unattractive policy options.

Obama Confident In Taking On Settlements Obama

Jewish backlash may be blunted

06/03/2009
Washington Correspondent

The Obama administration is confident it will retain strong Jewish support even as it ratchets up the pressure on Israel and offers clues that, unlike its predecessors, it means what it says about the thorny issue of Jewish settlements on the West Bank.

While the pro-Israel establishment is already reacting angrily to the administration’s shifted red lines on settlements, many analysts say President Barack Obama’s ability to soften tough positions with pro-Israel reassurances will prevent a broad Jewish backlash.

Dialing Down The Heat On Iran

Tamped-down rhetoric on Iran seen as “accommodation” with Obama’s new policy shift on Iran.

06/17/2009
Washington Correspondent

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu dialed down his intense rhetoric about the threat posed by a nuclear Iran in his long-awaited public response to a tightening squeeze from the Obama administration on Sunday.

Despite Iran Flux, Groups Hold To Tough Line

The unfolding drama on the streets of Tehran vastly complicates the fight for sanctions against Iran. getty images

06/24/2009
Washington Correspondent

On Monday AIPAC, the pro-Israel lobby group that has been at the forefront of efforts to impose and stiffen sanctions on Iran, distributed to reporters an interview with an Iranian demonstrator calling on the international community to apply “much more sanctions” on the government of President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad.

Where Did You Go, Ari Ben Canaan?

04/01/2008
Staff Writer
A public opinion pollster is interviewing people on the street. He stops four people and asks, “Excuse me, what is your opinion of the meat shortage?” 
A Russian says, “What is opinion?”
A Pole says, “What is meat?”
An American says, “What is shortage?”
An Israeli says, “What is ‘excuse me’?”


My first time in Israel  was an education. But not in the way I had anticipated.

Their End Of The Bargain

06/10/2009
Assistant Managing Editor
As President Barack Obama pumps new energy into what had been a moribund peace process, Jewish leaders are voicing concern that his line in the sand against new Israeli construction on the West Bank is unmatched by a concrete, reciprocal demand from the Palestinians. Although Obama, in his address to the Muslim world from Cairo last week, emphasized the need to abandon violence and for Israel’s enemies to accept its right to exist, some fear the pressure on Israel’s Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu will send a different message.
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