Benjamin Blech

For These Hard Times, Lessons In Resilience

06/05/2009
Staff Writer
During the Great Depression Sidney Kronish was, like countless Americans, out of work. He hunched over a typewriter for hours in his family’s cramped Bronx apartment, eventually mailing hundreds of job application letters. Other days, he took the subway to employment offices along Sixth Avenue in Manhattan. “No job was beneath me,” he says. After a series of menial jobs, he found his career in teaching. A keen sense of self-sacrifice, and a family he leaned on for support, kept him going, Kronish says.

For These Hard Times, Lessons In Resilience

06/03/2009
Staff Writer
During the Great Depression Sidney Kronish was, like countless Americans, out of work. He hunched over a typewriter for hours in his family’s cramped Bronx apartment, eventually mailing hundreds of job application letters. Other days, he took the subway to employment offices along Sixth Avenue in Manhattan. “No job was beneath me,” he says. After a series of menial jobs, he found his career in teaching. A keen sense of self-sacrifice, and a family he leaned on for support, kept him going, Kronish says.

Hitting The Roof Over ‘Sistine Secrets’

05/07/2008
Staff Writer
You could see the backlash coming. A yarmulke-wearing rabbi from Yeshiva University goes to the Vatican and finds secret insults to the pope and Jewish mystical codes embedded in Michelangelo’s painting of the Sistine Chapel. The rabbi, Benjamin Blech, teams up with Roy Doliner, a docent and guide at the Vatican, and their findings are published last week in the book, “The Sistine Secrets,” which claims that Michelangelo was influenced so greatly by Judaism that 95 percent of his painting depicts scenes from the Old Testament.
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