Barry Kosmin

New Evidence Of A Jewish Decline

03/13/2009
Staff Writer
Nearly two decades ago Barry Kosmin looked at the figures of a declining Jewish population in the United States and predicted that the numbers would continue to decline. His latest demographic study, released this week, proved him right. The percentage of Americans who identify their religion as Jewish fell to 1.2 percent, compared to nearly two percent in a comparable 1990 study, according to the American Religious Identification Study conducted by the Institute for the Study of Secularism in Society at Trinity College in Hartford, Conn.

The Intermarriage Dividend?

08/07/2009
Staff Writer
The latest major demographic study of American Jewry offers new insights into the post-intermarriage landscape. The good news: the potential size of the country’s “extended” Jewish community, members of intermarried families, is growing. The bad news: the number of Jews, mostly in intermarriages, who affiliate with another religion, is increasing.

The Numbers Game

09/27/2002
Staff Writer
Demography experts say the changes made in the National Jewish Population Survey 2000 methodology may make it impossible to compare 1990s reality to today’s. Several potentially important alterations were made to the interview questions, they said, and there are “methodological consequences related to the way people are interviewed,” said Egon Mayer, chairman of the sociology department at Brooklyn College and a member of the NJPS 2000 technical advisory committee.

The Intermarriage Dividend?

08/05/2009
Staff Writer
The latest major demographic study of American Jewry offers new insights into the post-intermarriage landscape. The good news: the potential size of the country’s “extended” Jewish community, members of intermarried families, is growing. The bad news: the number of Jews, mostly in intermarriages, who affiliate with another religion, is increasing.

New Evidence Of A Jewish Decline

03/11/2009
Staff Writer
Nearly two decades ago Barry Kosmin looked at the figures of a declining Jewish population in the United States and predicted that the numbers would continue to decline. His latest demographic study, released this week, proved him right. The percentage of Americans who identify their religion as Jewish fell to 1.2 percent, compared to nearly two percent in a comparable 1990 study, according to the American Religious Identification Study conducted by the Institute for the Study of Secularism in Society at Trinity College in Hartford, Conn.
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