Amy Spiro

'Main Street USA,' Just Across the River

The Jews of Roosevelt Island like the
small-town feel of their outpost.

04/01/2010
Editorial Intern

Talk about a Jewish diaspora.
Cut off from the Manhattan mainland and its very Jewish heartbeat, the Jews of Roosevelt Island may be the least-known Jewish community in the area.
Which is OK by them.

Rabbi Zalman and Nechama Duchman and their children. The Chabad emissaries settled in Roosevelt Island four years ago.

Power to the Pita

02/05/2010
Editorial Intern

The prospect of Greenwich Village’s best falafel enticed more than 120 hungry New Yorkers onto the cold streets late last month.

A “falafel crawl,” — which hit five kosher and non-kosher establishments in close proximity — was the latest adventure of NYC Food crawls, a group that began last October, with a dumpling crawl around Chinatown.

Mamoun’s Falafel on MacDougal Street received the most votes for taste and value on the Greenwich Village falafel crawl.

Keeping Pace With Nature's Fury

As a succession of disasters strike, Jewish relief organizations struggle to raise enough funds to respond.

09/12/2008
Editorial Intern

Almost four years after the 2004 tsunami in South Asia, one of the deadliest natural disasters in history, relief and rebuilding efforts in the affected areas are far from over.
But in the years since, disasters and crises in other areas of the world have also demanded attention and humanitarian aid, including the cyclone in Burma and the earthquake in Sichuan, China, both of which hit in May of this year, and more recently the war in South Ossetia, Georgia. Add to that the damage on U.S. soil from a succession of tropical storms and hurricanes.

Helping Other Activists' Children

Julius and Ethel Rosenberg’s son, an ardent critic of post-9/11 government tactics, will speak at Central Queens Y.

06/05/2009
Editorial Intern

He was only 6 years old when his parents — Ethel and Julius Rosenberg — were executed in 1953 by the United States government, after being accused of passing atomic secrets to the Russians.
“I was 3 when they were arrested and 6 when they were executed, and I don’t remember any of that sort of thing,” said Robert Meeropol, who took the last name of his adoptive parents.
But that hasn’t stopped him from dedicating his life to helping other children in similar positions, by starting the Rosenberg Fund for Children in 1990.

Robert Meeropol: Echoes of the McCarthy era.

Kosher Food Going Natural

New Emphasis on low-fat, low-carb, organic fare sweeping through industry.

02/05/2010
Editorial Intern

Traditional Jewish food — six-inch-high, artery-clogging corned-beef sandwiches, cholesterol-high cholent with kishke and chicken soup
flavored with fatty schmaltz — isn’t quite in line with a healthy, balanced diet.
But with American’s growing obsession with healthy foods, and organic products — the organic industry grew from $1 billion in 1990 to over $23 billion today — kosher producers are offering more wholesome and beneficial products, and health food producers are gaining kosher certification.

Juices from Organic Avenue — like apple, carrot, cucumber and grapefruit — are an integral part of the raw food experience.

The Festival of Lite

12/04/2009
Editorial Intern

Chanukah foods don’t exactly bring healthy images to mind. In Israel, this time of year every bakery in town is serving up trays and trays of sufganiyot, doughnuts with your choice of jelly, caramel or even chocolate filling.
But as people worry about their waistlines and calorie counts, indulging in a fried delicacy for eight nights may not be the best idea.

This Chanukah, you can choose healthier baked doughnut “muffins,” left, or the full-fat fried version, above.

Freedom From Fat

Editorial Intern
03/17/2010

 Two cups of oil. Thirty-two eggs.

This is the beginning of my mother’s matzah ball recipe — and while it serves for the entire week, we still eat two at every holiday meal.

36 Under 36 2009: Simcha Gross, 22

Staff Writer
04/24/2009

 Simcha Gross’s biggest problem? Too many attendees.

When an unprecedented 850 people showed up to the second Tanach Yom Iyun at Yeshiva University last December, Gross and Yehudah Bernstein, his fellow coordinator, had to scramble to find seats. And they couldn’t be happier.

"I believe in the passionate pursuit for religious truth," says Gross, who began formulating the program when he arrived at YU as a sophomore, and saw the first Yom Iyun take place last March.

36 Under 36 2009: Joe Teplow, 17

Staff Writer
04/24/2009

 Joe Teplow has met with sponsors, applied for a grant, built a Web site and started his own organization. All before senior calculus. Teplow, a senior at SAR High School in Riverdale, didn’t set out to start Teens for the World (TFTW), a group dedicated to helping other teens conduct charitable projects.

But last year, when he and a friend organized the overwhelmingly successful Skate for Sderot program, a hockey tournament that raised $10,000 for Connections Israel, they knew they weren’t done.

36 Under 36 2009: Joe Teplow, 17

Staff Writer
04/24/2009

 Joe Teplow has met with sponsors, applied for a grant, built a Web site and started his own organization. All before senior calculus. Teplow, a senior at SAR High School in Riverdale, didn’t set out to start Teens for the World (TFTW), a group dedicated to helping other teens conduct charitable projects.

But last year, when he and a friend organized the overwhelmingly successful Skate for Sderot program, a hockey tournament that raised $10,000 for Connections Israel, they knew they weren’t done.

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