Adam Mintz

Daddy’s Not At The Shabbos Table

12/21/1999
Jewish Week Book Critic

There’s 22-year-old Emma saying the blessing over the Shabbat candles with her mother, delighted by the light, humming a synagogue tune and then covering her mother’s face with wet kisses. Together, Emma and Judith remember out loud all the people to whom they want to wish Shabbat Shalom. The pair could be an advertisement for Jewish living, and at first glance they hardly look unconventional or revolutionary. In fact, they’re pioneers in the — Jewish community, for there’s no daddy — at least, not yet — on their list of Sabbath greetings.

High-Wire Act

The eruv — that ethereal yet physical boundary enabling observant Jews to push strollers and use wheelchairs on Shabbat — fosters community even as it sparks tensions.

03/06/2009
Before the Internet Age rendered geography irrelevant to community there was the eruv, the rabbinic response to spatial separation. A strategically placed wire here, a natural hedge border there, the inclusion of a fence or a highway, turns a neighborhood into an imaginary walled community of halachic intent, as such a deliberate remembrance of pre-diasporic Jerusalem.  

High-Wire Act

03/06/2009

Before the Internet Age rendered geography irrelevant to community there was the eruv, the rabbinic response to spatial separation. A strategically placed wire here, a natural hedge border there, the inclusion of a fence or a highway, turns a neighborhood into an imaginary walled community of halachic intent, as such a deliberate remembrance of pre-diasporic Jerusalem.  

Split In Young Israel Family

06/06/2003
Staff Writer
Things are growing nastier at 3 W. 16th St. in Manhattan. Last week, the Young Israel of Fifth Avenue (YIFA), an Orthodox synagogue with about 200 members located at the Chelsea address, was barred from receiving its packages. That's because the building owner is refusing to accept the synagogue's mail. The latest incident of anti-Semitism? Hardly. The building owner is the National Council of Young Israel, the parent organization for nearly 150 Orthodox synagogues across the country.

Whiskey Rebellion

02/18/2005
Staff Writer
If you want to make a l’chaim at some major Orthodox synagogues around New York, you’ll have to wait until after services for kiddush. The shuls have banned kiddush clubs. This comes following the recent decision of the Orthodox Union’s board of directors to encourage its member congregations to discontinue the informal drinking clubs that draw congregants from Saturday morning during services.
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