Yeshiva University

The Stem Cell Fast Track

Israeli researchers say they are already able to reverse some defects, and may soon be able to take on diseases.
Staff Writer
In a city where so many cultures seek spiritual reawakening, In an era when religion and science seem divided by a gaping chasm, one group of scientists is showing how these two belief systems may be a little closer than we think.

The God Vitamin?

New study reveals that regular worship attendance is linked to longer life expectancy.
Staff Writer
In an era when religion and science seem divided by a gaping chasm, one group of scientists is showing how these two belief systems may be a little closer than we think.

What’s New At The Seminaries?

What’s New At The Seminaries?
Staff Writer
Yeshiva University this year launched a new program, the Institute for University-School Partnership at YU’s Azrieli Graduate School of Jewish Education and Administration.

Gay YU Panel Broadens Discussion, Debate

Personal experiences draw big crowd to school’s campus, even as rabbis reaffirm ‘abomination’ of homosexual acts.
Staff Writer

A standing-room-only public forum last week at Yeshiva University could take the discussion about gay Jews in the Orthodox community from a single meeting hall to the entire movement, focusing on the balance between empathy for individuals and the halachic ban on homosexual activity.

An estimated 600 to 800 people last week attended “Being Gay in the Modern Orthodox World,” a panel discussion on the university’s Washington Heights campus sponsored by YU’s year-old Tolerance Club and its Wurzweiler School of Social Work.


‘This Was Their Life'

Staff Writer
Half asleep from his late-night travels to Mumbai, Chaim Zaklos trailed groggily behind an energetic Gavriel Holtzberg and suddenly found himself aboard a wooden motorboat, on an early spring morning of 2006. Filled with 150 ferry passengers and zero life jackets, the vessel rumbled away from the Gateway of India and chugged through a predawn Mumbai Harbor for about an hour, as the sun rose over their destination — the town of Alibag.

Navigating The Shoals Of Breast Cancer

Staff Writer
In the early 1990s, two oncologists — troubled by how frustrated and confused their newly-diagnosed breast cancer patients felt — decided to comprehensively address their lists of unanswered questions. The doctors teamed up to publish the first edition of a guidebook to breast cancer in 1992.

In The Heights, A Dialogue Starts

Staff Writer
En route to Yom Kippur services last year, Yeshiva University senior Ayol Samuels walked through Washington Heights sporting a pair of flip-flops, with a group of sandal-clad shul-goers strolling ahead. On his way, he passed a group of Dominican children congregated together on a nearby stoop.

After The Screening

Editorial Intern
After learning about the benefits of genetic screening from her physician, a pregnant woman decides to schedule an amniocentesis test. Doctors carefully screen her amniotic fluid sample, and they determine that her fetus has an extra 21st chromosome — in other words, the child will be born with Down syndrome. The patient instantly faces an emotional quandary: should she go forward with the pregnancy, or should she have an abortion? This kind of thorny ethical question was at the center of a forum on genetic disease forum held May 5 at the JCC in Manhattan.

Social Justice — An Orthodox Cause?

Staff Writer
Tikkun olam,” the powerful Jewish concept of repairing the world, has long been heralded as the rallying cry of Conservative and Reform Jewry. But a growing number of Orthodox 20- and 30-year-olds are trying to revive social justice responsibilities among their Orthodox peers — not as a liberal, humanistic-driven concept, but as one steeped in Jewish tradition and halacha.      
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