Yale

New Torah-Based Outreach Seen Energizing Hillel

Conference here explores success of engagement through sacred texts.

06/30/2010
Editor And Publisher

 Dan Smokler, a 31-year-old Yale graduate, ordained rabbi and former labor organizer, wears the mantle of the Jewish campus community’s equivalent of The Great White Hope with an easy grace.

Gary Rosenblatt

Will Women-Only Torah Study Soon Become Old-School?

The most remarkable aspect of the first full-time co-ed learning program just ending at the Drisha Institute for Jewish Education, a pioneer in advanced Torah study for women, is how unremarkable it felt.

I visited the experimental program for college and graduate students spending the month of June in a “student immersion program” that combined Talmud and philosophy in examining “the relationship between spirituality and community involvement and action,” according to the program description.

Yale Researchers Tout Jewish Nursery Program

05/04/2010

An effort to transform Jewish early childhood education has gotten a stamp of approval of sorts from the Yale Child Study Center.

The Jewish Early Childhood Education Initiative, which helps Jewish nursery schools strengthen their Judaic content and better engage parents while embracing the Reggio Emilia educational philosophy, was highlighted in a study by Yale professors J. P. Comer and Michael Ben-Avie. The results have been published in the latest issue of the Early Childhood Education Journal.

Michael Steinhardt: His funding for early education seen paying off.

A Lesson Of Tolerance

05/10/2002
Staff Writer

Speaking before several dozen people munching on babaganoush and taboule and chatting away in Arabic, Hebrew, Spanish and English, the Lebanese novelist Elias Khoury invoked the hallowed name of Al-Andalus.

"And if we do not find it, we can build it in our hearts," he said at the reception for a literary event last week in the Soho studio of Iraqi-born sculptor Oded Halahmy.

No Two Documentaries Are Alike

01/09/2008
Special To The Jewish Week

The second week of the New York Jewish Film Festival is heavily weighted towards documentaries, but these days that label covers such a huge swatch of territory that you can’t know what to expect. The movies included in this year’s event are no exception to the trend toward the unconventional in nonfiction cinema.

Studying Hate

Indiana U. launches contemporary anti-Semitism center, the second major academic institution of its kind. Will politics compromise its mission?

02/11/2010
Staff Writer

In recent years, Jewish intellectuals have sometimes bemoaned the anti-Zionist views heard on college campuses, and among liberal intellectuals generally, but have failed to do much about it. But that may be changing.

Last month, the chair of the Jewish studies department at Indiana University in Bloomington, Alvin Rosenfeld, announced the foundation of the Institute for the Study of Contemporary Anti-Semitism. His goal is to study, in a dispassionate, scholarly way, what he thinks is just a new version of a very old kind of hate: anti-Semitism.

Professor Alvin Rosenfeld, who teaches Jewish studies at Indiana University.

Explaining The Inexplicable

07/24/1998
Jewish Week Book Critic

More than 50 years after Hitler’s death, there’s no consensus among the many Holocaust scholars about the nature of his evil, his motivations, his self-awareness, his hiddenness. As journalist Ron Rosenbaum points out in his new book Explaining Hitler (Random House), there are many competing visions and passionate, bitter disputes.

What Accounts For German Fascism?

Award-winning film ‘The White Ribbon’ may distort picture
of how Nazis rose to power, new scholarship asserts.

01/15/2010
Staff Writer

Though Michael Haneke’s recently released film “The White Ribbon,” which won the prestigious Palme d’Or prize at the Cannes Film Festival, focuses on one small German village, in 1914, the director has made it clear that the issues it raises are much larger. “Why do people follow an ideology?” the director asks in the film’s official press release. “German fascism is the best-known example of ideological delusion,” he adds, and while his film is not an explanation of German fascism per se, he certainly encourages viewers to ponder the relationship. In the opening scene, the narrator even says that he hopes the story about to unfold might “clarify things that happened later in our country.”

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East of Auschwitz

In shifting the focus to the millions who died at the hands of mobile firing squads Yale historian Timothy Snyder puts the Holocaust in a broader context.

12/23/2009
Staff Writer

Every few years a poll comes out showing how little the general public knows about the Holocaust: in 2005, a poll found that only 40 percent of Canadians could correctly identify the number of Jews killed in the Holocaust, while one in six thought the number was less than a million. A BBC poll that year revealed that half of Britons had never even heard of Auschwitz.

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A Lesson Of Tolerance

05/10/2002
Staff Writer
Speaking before several dozen people munching on babaganoush and taboule and chatting away in Arabic, Hebrew, Spanish and English, the Lebanese novelist Elias Khoury invoked the hallowed name of Al-Andalus. "And if we do not find it, we can build it in our hearts," he said at the reception for a literary event last week in the Soho studio of Iraqi-born sculptor Oded Halahmy.
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