U.S. Supreme Court

Rubashkin Sentence Seen As ‘Piling On’

But debate over whether 27-year rap will hold up on appeal.
06/22/2010 - 20:00
Staff Writer

The 27-year bank fraud sentence imposed Tuesday on Sholom Rubashkin, former manager of what was once the nation’s largest kosher slaughterhouse, was widely viewed by law professors and criminal defense attorneys alike as too severe.

“A sentence of 27 years is beyond excessive, it is patently offensive — especially for a nonviolent crime in a case where the defendant had no prior criminal record,” said noted criminal attorney Ben Brafman, who was not involved in the case. 

Sholom Rubashkin: Judge said she tacked on points because of his “obstruction.”

Pat Buchanan Slams Obama Over Kagan

05/15/2010 - 20:00

(JTA) -- Syndicated columnist Pat Buchanan slammed President Obama for nominating a Jewish woman to serve on the U.S. Supreme Court.

Painting The Church-State Line

Left, right and a range of faiths join for statement clarifying where the law stands on religious expression.
01/21/2010 - 19:00
JTA

Washington — The Anti-Defamation League and the Southern Baptist Convention may butt heads over where the line ultimately should be drawn on the separation of church and state, but representatives of both organizations say they agree on where the law now stands — and with more than two dozen other experts they have come together to help explain it to the rest of the country.

After nearly four years of work, the organizational representatives have issued a 32-page document titled “Religious Expression in American Public Life: A Joint Statement of Current Law.”

Written in a question-and-answer format and including extensive endnotes, the document explains the state of the law on religious expression, answering queries such as “Are individuals and groups permitted to use government property for religious activities and events?” “May employees express and exercise their faith within secular nongovernmental workplaces?” and “Does the First Amendment place restrictions on the political activities of religious organizations?”

Marc Stern of the American Jewish Congress, left, and the OU’s Nathan Diament helped draft the new 32-page document.

Kiryas Joel Foes Holding Fire

10/21/1999 - 20:00
Staff Writer
Like Jesus' friend Lazarus, Sylvester Stallone's Rocky and the hope that springs eternal, Kiryas Joel, the upstate chasidic school district ruled thrice an affront to the constitution, has yet another legislative lease on life. Last week, the very week its latest appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court was turned down Kiryas Joel village took steps to resurrect the school district yet again under a law passed by the state legislature and signed by Gov. George Pataki last August.

Extracting Information Without Torture

09/09/1999 - 20:00
Staff Writer
The United States has long barred the types of “physical pressure” outlawed by Israel’s Supreme Count this week in an historic ruling. But that has not hamstrung law enforcement officials here in their counterterrorism efforts, say experts. This applies even to so-called “ticking time bomb” cases — where authorities are acting to prevent an imminent terrorist attack — of the sort that Israel claims pose a unique threat to its society, these sources say.

Pitch For Pluralism

05/13/1999 - 20:00
Staff Writer
For the first time, the Jewish Theological Seminary, which likes to be known as the spiritual center of Conservative Judaism, is involving itself ever so cautiously in next week’s Israeli elections. Just in time for the May17 vote, the seminary is advertising in two Israeli newspapers to gently remind Israeli voters not to forget the religious pluralism issue, which threatens to divide voters. “VOTE WITH YOUR HEART — AND YOUR HEAD,” urges the ad slated for the May 14 edition of Haaretz and Maariv.

First Hispanic? Judge For Yourself

08/11/2009 - 20:00
Staff Writer
Hispanic-Americans have been basking this summer in the glow of Sonia Sotomayor, the judge sworn in last week as an associate justice of the U.S. Supreme Court, becoming the first member of their community on the High Court. They may be kvelling 77 years too late, some mavens say.

Eruv Fight Going The Distance

02/06/2003 - 19:00
Staff Writer
The next stop for a New Jersey town's legal battle against an eruv erected by a group of Orthodox residents may be the U.S. Supreme Court. The Tenafly Borough Council voted 5-1 last week to petition the high court to hear its case against the Tenafly Eruv Association, two months after the 3rd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals declined to rehear the case.

Moves To Demonize Israel Seen Growing

Many Israeli soldiers could face charges; U.S. Supreme Court could provide remedy here

10/07/2009 - 20:00
Staff Writer

The decision this week of Israeli cabinet minister Moshe Yaalon not to fly to Britain for fear of being tried for an alleged seven-year-old war crime is seen as just the latest in a series of attempts to demonize Israel in the eyes of the world.

Israeli cabinet minister Moshe Yaalon.
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