Tel Aviv University

Funding In-Marriage Out Of His Own Pocket

In his first post-Birthright trip, ‘Momo’ Lifshitz shells out $250,000 to get across his ‘raise your children Jewish’ message. Is it selling?

01/06/2010
Staff Writer

Tel Aviv — Tucked into the rocky thickets of Mount Carmel in northern Israel, 43 American 20-somethings gathered in a hotel conference room to play a simple game — using their bodies as place markers, they lined up across the room according to how important they found dating Jews, and Jews alone.

At first, only four people stood on the “date Jews” side of the room. But when the question changed to marriage, four soon grew to 15. And when marriage changed to raising children Jewish, a good 15 more shuffled over.

"You have to try to find Jewish love,” Momo Lifshitz, inset, told his Oranim trip participants

True To Israel In Her Fashion

03/05/2008
Staff Writer
Want the cure for wedding jitters? Try getting into the Coterie, the fashion trade show held biannually in New York. At least that’s the method Malka Meiersdorf swears by. This past summer, the 30-year-old Upper West Side resident didn’t have time to fret about every last detail of her August wedding. She was too busy angling for a chance to launch Israeli fashion designer Naama Bezalel’s career in the United States through Milk & Honey Imports, Meiersdorf’s newly formed fashion import and distributor firm.  

Jewish-Gentile In The Jewish State

05/14/2008
Special To The Jewish Week
When I visited Israel for the first time, I fell in love. Not with any individual, although, like seemingly everyone else in the Overseas Student Program at Tel Aviv University, I harbored a hormonally charged admiration for the tan, arrogant, gun-toting young sabras who roamed the land.

Feeling The Latin Beat

08/09/2002
Staff Writer
Charly Rodriguez plays Latin jazz. So does Charly Schwartz: which may come as a surprise to his fellow band members in La Onda Va Bien. Schwartz and Rodriguez are the same person: the Brooklyn-born son of Cuban Jewish immigrants who raised him on equal parts Havana rhythms and "Hava Nagila."  

A Bard For Uncertain Times

01/24/2003
Staff Writer
The cover illustration of Etgar Keret's first book in English shows a smiley-faced figure in the act of blowing its brains out. Inside, suicide, murder and other forms of mutilation are featured in a good portion of the "other stories" in "The Bus Driver Who Wanted to Be God and Other Stories." Far from turning off readers, Keret's combination of bittersweet prose and morose subject matter has hit a nerve among Israelis born in an age of political and moral uncertainty.

Crash Course On Conflict

06/14/2002
Staff Writer
Jerusalem: Vicki Szenes, a shy 19-year-old with a dazzling smile, often could be seen in the background at the parties and religious celebrations sponsored by the new Hillel chapter at the State University of New York at Binghamton. But it wasn't until after Sept. 11 that the Yeshivah of Flatbush High School graduate and Staten Island native began to feel a pull to get more involved with Hillel, the foundation that encourages Jewish life at universities across the nation.

SUNY Cuts Study Programs In Israel

08/23/2002
Staff Writer
The State University of New York has suspended all of its overseas programs in Israel, citing last month's terrorist attack at Hebrew University where nine people (including five Americans) were killed, The Jewish Week has learned.

Peres: Bibi ‘Prisoner Of His Coalition’

10/16/1998
Staff Writer
Former Israeli Prime Minister Shimon Peres stressed the need for a Palestinian state, a national unity government in Israel, and reducing the power of religious parties, during a wide-ranging speech last week at Manhattan’s Plaza Hotel.

Can Iran's Nuclear Push Be Stopped?

Anne Frank, the Dutch teenager who through the power and intimacy of her diary became the best-known of the six million Jewish victims of the Holocaust, is most often recalled for an entry that reads: “... I still believe, in spite of everything,

11/25/2009
Editor and Publisher

Anne Frank, the Dutch teenager who through the power and intimacy of her diary became the best-known of the six million Jewish victims of the Holocaust, is most often recalled for an entry that reads: “... I still believe, in spite of everything, that people are truly good at heart ... that this cruelty, too, shall end, that peace and tranquility will return once more.”

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Flinging Dirt In Archaeology Dispute

10/25/2007

Editor-At-Large
The key organizer of a campaign to deny tenure to a Barnard College professor seen by some as virulently anti-Israel acknowledged this week that her petition against the professor may not have quoted the book completely accurately. Barnard alumna Paula Stern, who now lives in an Israeli settlement community on the West Bank, acknowledged Tuesday that her petition —signed now by more than 2,500 people — incorrectly quotes from Abu El-Haj’s book in charging she is grossly ignorant of Jerusalem geography.
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