Tel Aviv University

On-The-Job Jew Training

Two great new pieces out this week — both from West Coast Jewish publications — by women who grew up in interfaith families.

I especially related to the piece by Emily Savage, a staff writer at northern California’s The J, about how she’s basically acquired a Jewish education from working at a Jewish newspaper.

Bad Blogger, Good Jew?

I’ve been a very bad blogger recently (a whole week without posting), but a very good Jew: in the past 10 days, I’ve gone to services at three congregations, and attended a Storahtelling event. Plus, this Saturday morning I’ll be in shul (a fourth one!) yet again, for my niece’s bat mitzvah.

Those who pray three times a day, or are at least weekly shul-goers, may laugh at such modest accomplishments. Indeed, I’m sure someone will send me a nasty e-mail or post a comment saying this (along with being intermarried) is further evidence of my moral laxity. Nonetheless, for me, four synagogues in two weeks — not during the High Holidays — is something of a record.

Bauhaus Is Our House

05/22/2009
Staff Writer

Cream-colored stone apartment buildings line nearly every street in central Tel Aviv, each varying slightly in shape and size but adhering to a loosely defined style of openness and movement that is particular to Israel’s “White City.” (In 2003, the area was designated by UNESCO as a World Heritage Site.)

A tour of the distinctive architectural style that helps define the Tel Aviv look.

Israeli Scientists Chasing High-Tech Breakthroughs

09/26/2008
Editorial Intern

Israeli scientists in universities across the country have been forging ahead in recent months with new innovations in medicine and technology that could lead to breakthroughs.

Professor Shimon Efrat of Tel Aviv University’s Sackler Faculty of Medicine, along with graduate students Holger Russ and Yael Bar, have developed a way to cultivate healthy human beta cells in the laboratory and implant them into diabetes patients. They are now working to convince the body to accept these cells — a move that could pave the way to a new and simpler form of diabetes treatment.

For Bibi, The Political Tightrope Grows More Taut

Reports that Obama hoping prime minister
will have to include Livni in more centrist coalition.

03/18/2010
Israel Correspondent

Tel Aviv — Can Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu — a master tightrope walker — balance between the demands of an angry U.S. administration and the insistent right flank of his governing coalition?
 
Can he advance down the path of negotiations with the U.S. and Palestinians while continuing to hold fast to a coalition dominated by hardliners who are opposed to territorial concessions?
 

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu

Biden: Bond with Israel ‘unbreakable’ but U.S. will note misstep

Tel Aviv speech altered after Jerusalem housing announcement

03/11/2010

(JTA) -- The U.S.-Israel bond is unbreakable, but the United States will keep both sides accountable for their actions, U.S. Vice President Joe Biden said.

Biden's address Thursday at Tel Aviv University, meant to have been an expression of friendship, was altered in part by Israel's announcement this week that it planned to build 1,600 new housing units in disputed eastern Jerusalem.

Shidduch Chic

06/19/1998
Israel Correspondent

Jerusalem — Suddenly, it’s hip to be square in the Holy Land. Since the beginning of the year in Old Katamon, a historic, tree-lined neighborhood here, at least two dozen singles in their 30s and 40s have announced their engagements.

Although there is nothing unusual about Israelis getting hitched (by the age of 40 more than 90 percent have been married at least once), many, perhaps most of the above-mentioned brides and grooms met their soulmates through a professional or amateur matchmaker.

A Bard For Uncertain Times

01/24/2003

The cover illustration of Etgar Keret's first book in English shows a smiley-faced figure in the act of blowing its brains out. Inside, suicide, murder and other forms of mutilation are featured in a good portion of the "other stories" in "The Bus Driver Who Wanted to Be God and Other Stories."

Far from turning off readers, Keret's combination of bittersweet prose and morose subject matter has hit a nerve among Israelis born in an age of political and moral uncertainty.

Tel Aviv Invades The Upper West Side

03/08/2007
Editorial Intern

It isn’t an enviable task organizing an Israeli culture festival for a New York audience. For one thing, in seven days — with most performances concentrated on the weekend — how do you balance the realities of an Israeli cultural scene that often focuses more on benign subjects like nature, love and fantasy rather than politics and war — the subjects most prescient to Israel’s foreign supporters?

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