Senate

Sestak-Toomey Senate race in Pa. shaping up as critical test for J Street

Want to know just how well the fierce campaign by pro-Israel hawks to delegitimze J Street is working? Then pay close attention to the Senate race in Pennsylvania.

This week J Street, the pro-peace process, pro-Israel (don't bother sending nasty emails, I know your arguments) political action committee and lobby, endorsed Rep. Joe Sestak, the Democrat who unseated Sen. Arlen Specter, most recently a Democrat as well, in last week's primary.

Beinart's Cheating Heart (Intermarriage Might Be The Answer)

Let's start off with a song by Hank Williams that pretty much sums up Israel's response to American Jews: "Why can't you be the way you used to be? How come you find so many faults with me? Somebody's changed so let me give you a clue, why don't you love me like you used to do?"

Rand Paul Victory Poses Risks For Jewish Republicans as Tea Party Movement Surges

RJC, in unusual move, opposes Tea Party candidate.

05/26/2010
Washington Correspondent

 Rand Paul, the Tea Party insurgent who was the upset victor in last week’s Kentucky Republican Senate primary, could be the biggest headache yet for a Republican Party that hopes to capitalize on the populist surge without getting tainted by the angry movement’s extremists.

Some observers say Rand Paul’s strong pro-Israel views could draw Jewish campaign givers.

Media: Beinart - Young Jews Want Seats In Jewish Lobby

Peter Beinart warns that alienation from Israel now at a breaking point.

05/25/2010
Associate Editor

Once upon a time, assimilated Jews would, well, assimilate, leaving Judaism to the Jews. Similarly, Jewish liberals — prizing universalism over parochialism — pretty much left Zionism to the professional Zionists.

Peter Beinart’s New York Review of Books essay touched off a serious debate on Zionism.

Cuomo, Other Democrats Kick Off State Campaigns

05/25/2010

Branding themselves “the new Democrats,” leaders of the state’s largest party kicked off their 2010 campaign Tuesday at the Rye Hilton in Westchester, hoping to move past four years of scandal and turmoil and maintain control of Albany.

Congress Delays Iran Sanctions Bill, With AIPAC Blessing

05/25/2010
JTA

WASHINGTON (JTA) -- In a sign of closer White House-congressional coordination on Iran, Congress is delaying an Iran sanctions bill several weeks to give the Obama administration time to shepherd new sanctions through the U.N. Security Council.

The American Israel Public Affairs Committee blessed the delay, in part because an array of parallel measures are under consideration that would stiffen existing sanctions aimed at getting the Iranian regime to stand down from its suspected nuclear weapons program.

Kagan’s Nomination And What It Means

Religion not seen as key dividing line in country.

05/12/2010
Washington Correspondent

 The argument that anti-Semitism still stifles Jewish achievement in modern America will be a little harder to make if President Barack Obama’s second Supreme Court nomination passes muster with the Senate.

If Kagan is confirmed, the Supreme Court will have six Catholics and three Jews. Getty Images

Taking On Ahmadinejad

05/05/2010
Staff Writer

Political and Jewish leaders stood in the shadow of the United Nations Monday to denounce the presence of Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad at a UN conference on the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty.

“Iran’s presence at this conference is a sham,” bristled Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-N.Y.).

She then called for Senate hearings to investigate all companies that do business with Iran, thus helping it as it develops nuclear weapons to “enable terrorism.”

Photos by Michael Datikash

5 Up-and coming Jewish Republicans

Politics is never ending, and so is curiosity about the Jews who are running for or who have already attained public office.

Let's face it; all but one of the Jews in  the U.S. House and Senate are Democrats. So we were wondering: what about the next generation of Jewish Republican leaders?

Law Day and the US Senate

04/27/2010
Special to the Jewish Week

May 1 was proclaimed Law Day in 1958 by President Eisenhower, in an explicit effort to pre-empt the celebration of May Day as an international worker's holiday - one that honored the struggle for the eight-hour day begun in the US. But the celebration of the rule of law and observance of the struggle for workers' rights are not necessarily at odds. After all, it is through the democratic enactment of laws that our rights are made real. In our system, those laws are judged to be in accord with the protections of our Constitution - or not - by impartial courts.

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