Nazi Party

East Germany, In The Rear-View Mirror

Amie Siegel’s ‘visual essay’ looks back at ‘a country long over.’

05/04/2010
Special To The Jewish Week

About 90 minutes into Amie Siegel’s clever, witty rumination on the former East Germany, “DDR/DDR,” Siegel and her crew get into a spirited discussion about the best way to translate the German word “Wende,” literally “change,” since it used to refer to the series of upheavals that began with the fall of the Berlin Wall and ended after the reunification of Germany.

Documentary-maker Amie Siegel appears often on camera in “DDR/DDR,” her study of the former East Germany.

Günter Grass’ Skeletons

On the eve of his N.Y. reading, questions about morality, concealment and truth.

06/22/2007
Special To The Jewish Week

Ah, to live in a confessional age. The fever to publicly acknowledge past mistakes is the latest craze of popular culture. Contrition, apparently, is in. With the television box as the new confessional booth, celebrities rush to repent on Larry King, Oprah and even Tyra — all as a means of public expiation and shrewd career management.

And The Band Played On

Documentary looks at the relationship between
the Berlin Philharmonic and the Third Reich.

04/13/2010
Special To The Jewish Week

For most ordinary people, daily life under a repressive dictatorship would not present too many more problems than daily life in a democracy. Even for many in the arts, the difference would be minimal, even if the dictatorship was maximal. In a strange way, that seems to be the unintended message of Enrique Sanchez Lansch’s excellent new documentary, “The Reichsorchester: The Berlin Philharmonic and the Third Reich,” showing in the Museum of Modern Art’s annual “Kino!” series of new German films.

Protestors greet New York arrival of Berlin Philharmonic at the beginning of their 1955 U.S. tour.

Time’s Excellent Coverage Of The Shoah - 1943

Tuesday, December 23rd, 2008 Despite all the apologists, anyone in the United States during the 1940s, particularly a Jew, who said that he or she had no idea about the Holocaust was either an idiot or illiterate. Despite all the attacks on the media for not telling everything, and for not telling it on the front page, any person who read Time magazine, the number one newsweekly in 1943, was given all the information required to know that an extermination was underway that was unparalleled in history.  

Dark Star

05/16/2003
Staff Writer
Next week, television viewers will have a chance to spend a few revealing hours with Adolph Hitler. "Hitler: The Rise of Evil," the two-part miniseries that airs May 18 and 20 on CBS, covers biographical territory well-known to fans of the History Channel, the cable network awash in Hitler-centric documentaries. But for audiences with limited knowledge of Hitler's prewar career, the lushly filmed four-hour drama will illuminate how the infamous hate-monger came to wield unlimited power over a modern democratic nation.

Bradley's Wife Condemns Austria

02/11/2000
Staff Writer
Ernestine Schlant Bradley, a Holocaust author and wife of presidential candidate Bill Bradley, told a group of Flatbush yeshiva students that she and her husband agree that the United States must keep the pressure on Austria to reverse the decision to include the rightist Freedom Party in its new coalition government. "It's a very disturbing and crippling event," the German-born professor of German literature at Montclair College in New Jersey told about 350 students Monday at the Yeshivah of Flatbush-Joel Braverman High School.

For German Converts, A New Home for the Soul

04/14/2009
Staff Writer

Trekking through ice-coated fields in a brutally cold Russian October, Lt. Arthur Wollschlaeger pressed on, as he and his swastika-emblazoned companions conquered the western Russian city of Orel — another victory for the unrelenting German Werhmacht infantry. He had earlier taken part in invasions of Poland, Holland and France — a World War II military career that began when he first entered the Czechoslovakian Sudetenland, in 1938.

Bernd Wollschlaeger, carrying the Torah, broke from his parents to become a Jew.
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