Kadima Party

After Flotilla Debacle, Will Netanyahu Change Course?

Analysts disagree on whether he will reach out to Kadima and how he will handle inquiry demands.

06/08/2010
Staff Writer

Depending on whom you ask, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu is either on the verge of reshuffling his cabinet or is digging in his heels following last week’s Gaza flotilla debacle.

“I don’t see any sign of it,” Yossi Alpher, an Israeli political analyst, said of a possible government shake-up. “Netanyahu continues to rely on a cabinet of seven for key policy decisions.”

Opposition leader Tzipi Livni of the Kadima party, above, called Monday for a no-confidence vote in Benjamin Netanyahu’s gov't

New Scandal Dooms Chances Of Olmert Comeback

Bribe allegations in Holyland development may be hard to overcome.

04/20/2010
JTA

Jerusalem — Whether or not he is found guilty of taking bribes in the Jerusalem Holyland corruption scandal, Ehud Olmert’s political career is almost certainly over.

At best, the former prime minister and ex-mayor of Jerusalem can expect many months, if not years, of litigation that will further tarnish his already tainted reputation and leave him unelectable. At worst, he faces a long prison term.

Olmert: Suspected of having taken $1 million in bribes.

Gauging The Fallout From British Expulsion

Action against Israeli diplomat could pave way for possible arrests of IDF officers in England.

03/24/2010
Staff Writer

Britain’s expulsion of an Israeli diplomat over the use of a dozen forged British passports in the killing of a Hamas terrorist in January means Israeli army officers could be arrested if they visit Britain, according to a specialist on the United Kingdom and the Arab-Israeli conflict.

For Bibi, The Political Tightrope Grows More Taut

Reports that Obama hoping prime minister
will have to include Livni in more centrist coalition.

03/18/2010
Israel Correspondent

Tel Aviv — Can Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu — a master tightrope walker — balance between the demands of an angry U.S. administration and the insistent right flank of his governing coalition?
 
Can he advance down the path of negotiations with the U.S. and Palestinians while continuing to hold fast to a coalition dominated by hardliners who are opposed to territorial concessions?
 

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu

Links: the U.S.-Israel crisis intensifies

The U.S.- Israel diplomatic firestorm continues to rage, and a lot of questions remain unanswered: exactly what did Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu know about the plan to build 1600 new housing units in East Jerusalem, announced with such devastating impact when Vice President Joe Biden headed to Israel on a make-nice mission, and when did he know it? What is the Obama administration trying to do with its tough new demands on Israel and harsh rhetoric?  Where does all this lead?

Here are some interesting and very different takes on the  crisis.

Young Ethiopians Fighting Back

12/19/2007
Israel Correspondent

Petach Tikvah, Israel — Recounting how officials in this central-Israel city stonewalled complaints this month about the segregation of four Ethiopian schoolgirls, Daniel Uoria paused to answer his cell phone. It was an adviser to the deputy mayor.

"It’s because the minister of education is coming here to see what happened," explained Uoria, 29, after the call as he sat in an office at the headquarters of the Kadima Party. "Once you make a stink, suddenly everybody wants to help."

Shockwaves From Ramon Sex Conviction

02/02/2007
Staff Writer
The conviction of Haim Ramon, former Israeli justice minister, on an indecency charge this week, may lead to a shakeup of Prime Minister Ehud Olmert’s coalition government and a re-examination of the country’s sexual harassment laws, Israeli politicians said. Ramon, 56, a close ally of Olmert, was found guilty Wednesday by Tel Aviv’s Magistrate Court for forcibly kissing a 21-year-old soldier at a party six months ago. He faces three years in jail, and is expected to appeal the verdict.

Arab Land-Ban Panned

07/27/2007
Staff Writer
American organizations that advocate equal rights for Arab residents of Israel were critical of a bill passed by the Knesset in an early stage last week that would limit the sale of Jewish National Fund land sales to Jews. The bill, approved in its first reading by a 64-16 vote, would bypass a 2004 court ruling and in effect bar the Israel Lands Authority from selling JNF land to Israeli Arabs.

In Israel, Rescuing Government From Itself

Arye Carmon, president of the Israel Democracy Institute (IDI), says that one of Israel’s most serious existential threats comes not from Iran or the Arab world but from within.

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