Indiana University

Studying Hate

Indiana U. launches contemporary anti-Semitism center, the second major academic institution of its kind. Will politics compromise its mission?

02/11/2010
Staff Writer

In recent years, Jewish intellectuals have sometimes bemoaned the anti-Zionist views heard on college campuses, and among liberal intellectuals generally, but have failed to do much about it. But that may be changing.

Last month, the chair of the Jewish studies department at Indiana University in Bloomington, Alvin Rosenfeld, announced the foundation of the Institute for the Study of Contemporary Anti-Semitism. His goal is to study, in a dispassionate, scholarly way, what he thinks is just a new version of a very old kind of hate: anti-Semitism.

Professor Alvin Rosenfeld, who teaches Jewish studies at Indiana University.

Youth Philanthropy Grows Up

01/09/2009
Staff Writer
Rachel Rosenfeld opened up a school in Cambodia. Danny Schwartz donated kitchens to six Ethiopian families in Israel. And Becky Weinberg organized “Becky’s Closet,” donating princess-like dresses to needy bat mitzvah girls in Canarsie, Brooklyn. The common denominator? All three are New York Jews under the age of 18.

Holy Toledo!

12/19/2008
Staff Writer
Philadelphia — Aviva Koloski, a junior at Stern Hebrew High School here, plays on her Modern Orthodox day school’s girls’ basketball team, but she never considered playing basketball in college. Because of various halachic restrictions, “I never would have thought it was possible for an Orthodox Jewish girl to play basketball” at the collegiate level, she said. Today, Koloski is giving the matter another thought.

Holy Toledo!

12/17/2008
Staff Writer
Philadelphia — Aviva Koloski, a junior at Stern Hebrew High School here, plays on her Modern Orthodox day school’s girls’ basketball team, but she never considered playing basketball in college. Because of various halachic restrictions, “I never would have thought it was possible for an Orthodox Jewish girl to play basketball” at the collegiate level, she said. Today, Koloski is giving the matter another thought.

Is Y's Open Door A Barrier?

10/13/2006
Staff Writer
Shortly after Linda Moses and Arthur Gurevitch, a young couple on the Upper East Side, enrolled their 5-year-old son in an art class this fall at the 92nd Street Y, they discovered that the Y's Sunday Young Artists class was starting on Sukkot. Moses and Gurevitch, "somewhat observant" Conservative Jews and participants in Y programming for two decades, had assumed that the art class, as in past years, would skip Sukkot, which was last Sunday, and Simchat Torah, this Sunday.

From Coexistence House To White House

12/22/2006
Staff Writer
Since establishing the Middle East Coexistence House, a dormitory floor where Jews, Muslims and members of other faiths live together, at the New Brunswick campus of Rutgers University in New Jersey three months ago, Danielle Josephs has described the innovative dialogue project to Jewish activists around the country, Rutgers donors and alumni, faculty members and representatives of non-governmental organizations and journalists. On Monday she told the President of the United States about her idea.
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