Hebrew University

Centrist Party To Use Charity For Campaign

03/12/1999
Staff Writer
In the clearest account to date of how Israeli political candidates exploit U.S. charities for their campaign needs, an activist for Israel’s new centrist party, Mercaz, this week detailed its plans to raise at least $750,000 from U.S. donors through an American nonprofit organization. “[We’ve] created a ‘Friends of Mercaz’-type agency to which people can actually donate their money,” enthused Shelly Sitton, referring to the Mercaz Party. “The other parties have been doing it for decades.”

Likud’s Tangled Charity Web

02/19/1999
Staff Writer
Nearly a half-million dollars raised in America for Israeli children by Likud fund-raisers cannot be properly accounted for, a joint investigation by The Jewish Week and the Israeli daily paper Haaretz has found. The joint probe, which included scrutiny of Israeli leader Benjamin Netanyahu’s campaign financing, has found that some of the money in question — about $47,000 — was instead channeled directly to the Likud Party and other Israeli political causes.

SUNY Cuts Study Programs In Israel

08/23/2002
Staff Writer
The State University of New York has suspended all of its overseas programs in Israel, citing last month's terrorist attack at Hebrew University where nine people (including five Americans) were killed, The Jewish Week has learned.

New Trouble Ahead On The Green

08/30/2002
Staff Writer
Just back from a mission to Israel for college newspaper editors, the incoming editor in chief of the University of California at Irvine weekly was asked by a reporter about his reaction to the massacre at Hebrew University. "Obviously it feels closer to home because I'm a university student myself," said Abel Pena, a 23-year-old senior, referring to the July 31 bomb blast credited to Hamas that killed nine people, including five Americans. "But I don't want to rush to any kind of judgment on the action that was taken against the students."

New Trouble Ahead On The Green

08/30/2002
Staff Writer
Just back from a mission to Israel for college newspaper editors, the incoming editor in chief of the University of California at Irvine weekly was asked by a reporter about his reaction to the massacre at Hebrew University. "Obviously it feels closer to home because I'm a university student myself," said Abel Pena, a 23-year-old senior, referring to the July 31 bomb blast credited to Hamas that killed nine people, including five Americans. "But I don't want to rush to any kind of judgment on the action that was taken against the students."

Tribute To The Fallen

09/06/2002
Staff Writer
Rebecca Spilke walked slowly to the lectern at Sutton Place Synagogue. Taking a deep breath, the petite, brown-haired 26-year-old spoke of her love for Benjamin Blutstein. "I was almost excited to come here; I was expecting to see Ben," she confided to the audience of about 200. But Ben would not be at the East Side synagogue. Nor would eight others who were killed with him on July 31when a terrorist bomb exploded in the Frank Sinatra cafeteria at Hebrew University's Mount Scopus campus.

First Temple Fireworks

01/24/2003
Staff Writer
He was no King David. But biblical King Joash has suddenly been thrust into the international limelight. Joash, who ruled the Kingdom of Judah for about 40 years (835-793 BCE), is linked to a fascinating debate over the authenticity of a 2,800-year-old stone tablet that bears his name. The black sandstone tablet would be the most spectacular (and virtually only) archaeological find linked to the First Temple: coming at a time when some Arab Muslim leaders claim the two Jerusalem Temples never existed on the Temple Mount.

A Code For A New Age

11/13/1998
Staff Writer
Clinton and Lewinsky. The general manager of the New York Mets. Teens shaving their heads and piercing their tongues. High schoolers killing their classmates with guns. Popular culture in America is not providing a pretty picture to those interested in teaching their kids ethics and morals. But how should they be taught? Whose ethics? And what are morals, anyway?

Interfaith Scholars To Study Vatican War Archives

10/22/1999
Staff Writer
Nineteen months after it was first proposed, an “unusual” agreement was reached this week between the Vatican and Jewish leaders to assemble a team of scholars to study World War II-era Vatican records that have been publicly available for more than 30 years. Jewish leaders cautioned it is only a first step in answering questions about the Vatican’s response to the Holocaust. A key area of inquiry will be the actions of Pope Pius XII, whom critics say kept silent during the Holocaust.
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