Hebrew College

‘Rabbi Is The Highest Title For Teacher’

01/16/2008
Israel Correspondent

Jerusalem — In a bold educational initiative called at once “problematic” and “a blessing,” the Shalom Hartman Institute will offer a joint rabbinical program that will train Reform, Conservative, Reconstructionist and Orthodox rabbinical students — men and women — in the same classroom.

Maimonides Meets Microsoft

11/22/2002
Staff Writer
Think of My Jewish Learning — the Jewish Internet-based venture from mega-donors Lynn Schusterman and Edgar Bronfman launched this week — as “Encyclopedia Judaica” on Broadband or Maimonides Meets Microsoft.   

Hebrew College To Ordain Rabbis

01/24/2003
Staff Writer
Boston's Hebrew College, the 82-year-old center of secular Jewish studies, plans to open the doors of a new rabbinical school in September, adding to the handful of Jewish independent ordaining institutions in the United States. The new program will likely create competition for students among New York-based seminaries. The move by Hebrew College, which has about 400 students enrolled in undergraduate and graduate programs in Jewish studies and Jewish education, is being welcomed in some quarters and criticized in others.

Creator Of ‘Mini-Israel’

10/29/2004
Staff Writer
Shlomo Shulsinger, a Jerusalem native who came to the United States with his family as a teenager and became a pioneer in the Hebrew-speaking summer camping field, died Oct. 19 in his hometown after a long illness. He was 92 and was buried on the Mount of Olives. Mr. Shulsinger — who was known to his campers simply as Shlomo — founded Camp Massad in Far Rockaway, Queens, and developed the day camp into three overnight camps in the Poconos. The camps closed in 1981. Mr. Shulsinger retired in 1977, returning with his wife, Rivka, to Jerusalem.

HUC Closes New York Kollel

06/29/2007
Staff Writer
The New York Kollel, a 12-year-old adult education program that has met at the Reform movement’s rabbinical seminary in Manhattan and offered advanced yeshiva-style studies from a non-denominational, non-Orthodox perspective, is giving its last classes this summer. Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion, which has housed and helped support the Kollel since 1995, announced this spring that it would close the program, following a two and a half year “strategic planning process” that found the Kollel to be a financial drain.
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