Anti-Defamation League

Staking His Claim

06/25/1999
Staff Writer
When the latest round of talks were held in Jerusalem this week to resolve Nazi-era insurance claims, a prominent New York Jewish leader was seated at the table. But he was not sitting with the victims. "I came into this to try to come up with some basis to move the settlement process forward," explained Kenneth Bialkin, who earlier this year became lead counsel in the talks for Italy's largest insurer, Assicurazioni Generali.

Clash Over Nazi-Era Policies

05/07/2008
Staff Writer
For some Holocaust survivors and their supporters, a Senate subcommittee hearing this week was their last chance to collect on the Nazi-era life insurance policies of their parents. The survivors asked that Congress adopt legislation that would require insurance companies doing business in the United States to publish the names of all policyholders from the pre-war era. If the companies then refused to settle claims on reasonable terms, survivors and their heirs could sue them during the next 10 years.

Haider Runs, Doesn't Hide From Jews

11/12/1999
Staff Writer
Austrian far-right leader Joerg Haider, here to run in Sunday's New York Marathon, said he met with Jewish leaders the following day to correct "prejudicial" reports spread about him by his political enemies. "All of the meetings ... with ethnic minorities, with Jewish groups, with representatives of the Jewish community have been really successful," he told The Jewish Week. "It makes me happy that we could show them that there is no sign of danger, that there is a sign of hope for them because we are the power to enforce democracy in Austria."

Hofstra Paper Defends Revisionist Insert

11/05/1999
Staff Writer
Responding to outrage of ADL and others, editor claims booklet is protected under First Amendment. A 28-page booklet published by Holocaust denier Bradley R. Smith has touched off a controversy on the campus of Hofstra University in Hempstead, L.I., after the school newspaper became the first in the country to run it in last week's edition.

A Worldwide Plague

10/27/2000
Staff Writer
Yehudit Moch of Park Slope walked into St. Vincent's Hospital in Greenwich Village last week sporting a T-shirt embroidered with a large Star of David. "You'd better close your jacket," said the receptionist, who was half-Jewish. "It's not safe to be wearing that on the streets of New York."

At Hicksville seminar on acceptance, Solomon Schechter High students learn 'you can't take words back.'

02/06/1998
Staff Writer
Nicole Simon, a 10th-grader at the Solomon Schechter High School in Hicksville, was shocked and hurt recently when she boarded the school bus and a seventh-grader called her a "nigger." "I didn't know what to do," said the West Hempstead student. "The older kids on the bus had told him that to be cool at high school it was cool to say nigger. I was never called a nigger before. I was appalled."

Clinton 'Fritters Away' Opportunity for Strong Iraq Action

Jewish leaders saw the Clinton administration’s last-minute decision to call off an imminent bombing raid on Iraq as one more retreat by Washington in the face of Saddam Hussein’s skillful maneuvers.

11/20/1998
Washington Correspondent
‘He Frittered It Away’ ‘It’s so obvious, it’s almost comical,” said Abraham Foxman, national director of the Anti-Defamation League. “We know exactly what Saddam’s doing, but we continue to play his game.”

Obama slammed on faith based office

Monday, July 27th, 2009 It’s no secret that many liberals and church-state separation advocates are angry about  President Obama’s handling of the faith-based initiatives of his predecessor. Although they’ve mostly kept quiet about it, the folks at the Anti-Defamation League and the American Jewish Committee – which were hoping for much more of a rollback from policies of the George W. Bush administration – can’t be happy.
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