the City University of New York

The Fire Last Time - Part 2

Thursday, May 28th, 2009 (Here’s another look back at the aftermath of the previous attack by Islamic radicals in Riverdale)   May 20, 2003   A Fire Next Time   The sentencing of an Arab who tried to bomb a Riverdale synagogue brings fears to surface.   Jonathan Mark - Associate Editor   Khaled J., leaning against a wall in the gloomy light of the Bronx County Courthouse, says he has nothing against Jews.  

Jewish Identity, To a 'T'

08/29/2003
Staff Writer
Want to create an instant community? Just add cotton. That's what one San Francisco-based entrepreneur says she's doing with a line of T-shirts silk-screened with the slogans "Yo Semite" (a play on the national park's name) and "Jews for Jeter": in support of the Yankees' star shortstop. Undeniably clever, the shirts ($15 to $20) are "no joke" to their designer, Sarah Lepton, 30.

Status Woe

05/09/2003
Staff Writer
Are the growing numbers of women rabbis and ministers devaluing the power of the clergy? That was among the issues raised at a thought-provoking two-day conference recently on women and religion sponsored by the Tanenbaum Center for Interreligious Understanding. The conference at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York , titled "Women Through the Prism of Religion," featured some of the top women theologians and religious activists from Judaism, Catholicism, Islam, Buddhism and Hinduism.

Jewish Secularists Unite

07/25/2003
Staff Writer
The non-religious Jew, the secular, the humanist, the cultural Jew: in a city rich with synagogues and tradition-oriented classes, where are they to turn? There will soon be a new haven for such folks, whose ranks, according to recent studies, are swelling. Those in the region who describe themselves as "just Jewish" or "secular" or "having no religion" have nearly doubled in the last decade, from 13 to 25 percent, according to the recent New York population study.

Casting Themselves In A New Light

08/27/2004
Staff Writer
Bathed in light, wrapped in a tallit and kittel, the soul of a middle-aged New York Jew speaks to his earthly body on a Queens side street late one night last week. “Chaim, Chaim,” calls the soul, flanked by a pair of large menorahs, an ark of Torah scrolls behind him, “good Shabbos. Did you have a good week?” A plaintive voice — of Chaim himself, who is mentally disabled — is heard answering, “Nobody likes me.” Don’t despair, answers the soul. “Soon it will all be over.”
Syndicate content