surgery

Renewal's Struggle For Acceptance

04/21/2000
Staff Writer
Like a cross between the voice of God and a vintage radio broadcast full of pop and hiss, the disembodied sound of Rabbi Zalman Schachter-Shalomi filled the sanctuary of Congregation B'nai Jeshurun. It was a Shabbat celebration of the 75th birthday of Schachter-Shalomi, the rebbe of the Jewish Renewal movement, who is nearly universally known as Reb Zalman. For four decades he has been considered by many to be a marginal figure but has, in fact, also breathed a spark of spirit into the inner life of mainstream Judaism.

Making The Cut

05/15/2009
Staff Writer
A recent Facebook message from a total stranger, one of dozens and dozens Jessica Queller has received since she went public this year with an agonizingly personal medical decision, shared a familiar story. The stranger, a woman in her mid-30s, was a cancer survivor, unmarried, with no immediate matrimonial prospects. She wanted to have children. Queller understood.

Fighting The Odds

07/28/2006
Staff Writer
Last month, Barbara Pfeiffer had surgery to remove both her breasts. A year ago, she had a total hysterectomy, removing her uterus and ovaries. The 46-year-old has never been diagnosed with cancer. She had these healthy body parts surgically removed because she has a strong family history of cancer and a genetic mutation making it overwhelmingly likely that she would develop breast or ovarian cancer in her lifetime.

Making The Cut

05/13/2009
Staff Writer
A recent Facebook message from a total stranger, one of dozens and dozens Jessica Queller has received since she went public this year with an agonizingly personal medical decision, shared a familiar story. The stranger, a woman in her mid-30s, was a cancer survivor, unmarried, with no immediate matrimonial prospects. She wanted to have children. Queller understood.

‘Source Of Inspiration’

12/10/2008
Staff Writer
Richard Scheuer, a real estate executive and philanthropist who spent his retirement years in Jewish communal affairs, as an active supporter of several Reform institutions, Israeli archaeology and The Jewish Museum, died on Nov. 7. A resident of Larchmont, he was 91, and succumbed to heart failure after surgery.

Comforting The Afflicted

05/07/1999
Staff Writer
The Talker family faced a medical crisis and a moral dilemma last month. Kinneret Talker, 30, required surgery to remove a thyroid tumor. The operation would cost at least $6,000. "I don't have $6,000," says Chaim Talker, Kinneret's husband, a native of Israel who works in a Brooklyn electronics store. The couple, who came from Israel in 1991 and have no health insurance here, live in Midwood.Kinneret would have the surgery, Chaim decided. Maybe they would arrange to pay the bill over time. Maybe they couldn't pay at all.

Operation Bat Mitzvah

03/10/2006
Staff Writer
First came the date for the bat mitzvah. Marcy Marbut and her parents picked that out three years ago. Then the invitations. They were mailed out a month and a half ago. And there was the bat mitzvah tutor, the party planner, the outfit for the simcha and other details. "This was very organized: everything was planned," Marcy said. "The only thing I didn't plan on was getting sick." The snag: a ruptured appendix.

The Chance To Fight Back

04/09/2004
Staff Writer
Military service is in the Perl family’s blood. Pvt. Otto Perl spent nearly a year in the Austrian army from 1937 to 1938. His father had been an officer in that same army in World War I, and two of his uncles had served in WWI. Perl, a tailor, was 22 in early 1938 when he was discharged a few months before his homeland was annexed by Nazi Germany. A Jew, he was arrested and sent to the Dachau and Buchenwald concentration camps for a year. He survived the forced labor and beatings and frigid weather.

Dwindling Days Of Awe

09/08/2004
Staff Writer
On Rosh HaShanah will be inscribed and on Yom Kippur will be sealed how many will pass from the earth and how many will be created, who will live and who will die … From the Rosh HaShanah liturgy On these summer days in the late autumn of his life, on the mornings when he feels strong enough, Harold Dubow opens a siddur. Waking late in a living room on the edge of Brooklyn’s Midwood neighborhood, he takes some pills, eats a small cereal breakfast and recites Shacharit from a large-print prayerbook he keeps nearby on a small table.

Rites Of Triumph (part 1)

08/22/2001
Staff Writer
First came the dogs. At 5, two years after he was diagnosed with a deadly brain tumor, Spenser Scharfman had developed a love for animals, and he told his parents he wanted a pet. “When you’re 7, we’ll get you a dog,” they told him. “We had no idea what that meant,” Stewart Scharfman says — they didn’t think Spenser would survive two more years.
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