surgery

I Can Help Them Get Through This

06/22/2007
Special To The Jewish Week

Nella Shapiro’s waiting room feels more like a living room than an antiseptic medical office. European vintage posters, lush plants and colorful sofas fill the room, and the breast surgeon is often up front, greeting patients by name. One day last week, a woman who had surgery about six years ago insisted on coming in with a friend who is now a patient, just to say hello to the doctor.

"You saved my life," she reminds the doctor, who then asks about the woman’s grandson.

Warts And All

01/02/2008
Rabbi David Wolpe is spiritual leader of Temple Sinai in Los Angeles.

A rabbi is speaking with a doctor, who says, “You know, Rabbi, I often treat patients without asking them to pay.” The rabbi responds, “I do that too.” The doctor, perplexed, persists: “You know, I often write prescriptions and cover the cost myself.” The rabbi muses, “Yes, I do that too.” The doctor, frustrated, says, “I even do surgery and forgo my normal fee!” The rabbi nods, and says, “Yes, I do that too.”

The Year That Nonprofits Want To Forget

JTA
12/25/2009

Some years are more memorable than others. I can still recall the end of 1987, the year I moved to Israel and, six weeks later, the start of the first Palestinian intifada. I was living in Abu Tor, a Jerusalem neighborhood split right down the middle, with Jews on one side and Arabs on the other. I could smell the burning tires and tear gas from my apartment.
 

War, New Leaders And … Mortgages

Israel Correspondent
12/25/2009

Some years are more memorable than others. I can still recall the end of 1987, the year I moved to Israel and, six weeks later, the start of the first Palestinian intifada. I was living in Abu Tor, a Jerusalem neighborhood split right down the middle, with Jews on one side and Arabs on the other. I could smell the burning tires and tear gas from my apartment.
 

Attacking Cancer At Its Roots

Special To The Jewish Week
01/30/2009

I didn’t know what real loveliness was until I saw my Aunt Nomi in the hallway of Sloan Kettering Cancer Center wearing a visitor’s gown and a face mask.
   

“Where are you coming from?” I asked her. I had just left my grandfather’s room, Nomi’s father, when I saw her exiting a different room.

Attacking Cancer At Its Roots

When her disease returned, the author’s aunt took matters (or scissors) into her own hands. The unlikeliest upsherin.

01/30/2009
Special To The Jewish Week
    I didn’t know what real loveliness was until I saw my Aunt Nomi in the hallway of Sloan Kettering Cancer Center wearing a visitor’s gown and a face mask.     “Where are you coming from?” I asked her. I had just left my grandfather’s room, Nomi’s father, when I saw her exiting a different room.

Navigating The Shoals Of Breast Cancer

10/29/2008
Staff Writer
In the early 1990s, two oncologists — troubled by how frustrated and confused their newly-diagnosed breast cancer patients felt — decided to comprehensively address their lists of unanswered questions. The doctors teamed up to publish the first edition of a guidebook to breast cancer in 1992.

‘Source Of Inspiration’

12/12/2008
Staff Writer
Richard Scheuer, a real estate executive and philanthropist who spent his retirement years in Jewish communal affairs, as an active supporter of several Reform institutions, Israeli archaeology and The Jewish Museum, died on Nov. 7. A resident of Larchmont, he was 91, and succumbed to heart failure after surgery.

'Historic' Apology

09/17/1999
Staff Writer
While recovering from surgery to remove a brain tumor earlier this month, Cardinal John O'Connor composed his annual New Year's letter to his many friends in the New York Jewish community. In fact, the 79-year-old leader of New York City Catholics has been sending heartfelt holiday greetings twice a year (on Rosh HaShanah and Passover) to Jewish leaders for at least 10 years.

Testing The Borders Of Inclusivity

03/14/2003
Staff Writer
When Reuben Zellman was a girl, he didn't know that he wanted to become a rabbi. But since he began identifying as male four years ago, his Jewish involvement has become more intense and, with the support of his synagogue community, he realized that he wanted to become a leader of the Jewish people. Zellman has recently been granted his wish with admission to the Reform movement's rabbinical school. He will begin his studies next summer. Sources say that Zellman will be the first transgender individual ever to study in rabbinical school.
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