counseling

Despite Signs Of A Recovery, Job Fair Draws 700

Organizers at UJA-Federation’s Connect to Care program had expected only 400.

03/11/2010
Special To The Jewish Week

Like many commuters, David Arnou traveled to Manhattan on March 2 wearing a suit and tie, carrying a brown-leather briefcase and looking crisp. An accountant who has worked as the comptroller of a private firm and the director of a nonprofit agency, he even showed up where he had to go 90 minutes early.

The scene at the March 2 job fair at the JCC in Manhattan.

When Veterans Come Home

06/22/2007
Special To The Jewish Week

Much of the public thinks of a soldier’s return home as a joyous time for the veteran and his or her family, but the reality can be more complicated, said Jacob Remo, the commander of a Jewish War Veterans post near Boston and a member of JWV’s Health Initiatives Committee.

The transition from war to peace is often difficult as roles change within the family, as the soldier returns to work or looks for a new job and as civilian life begins anew, Remo said, adding that all members of the family feel the stress.

After The Screening

05/14/2008
Editorial Intern
After learning about the benefits of genetic screening from her physician, a pregnant woman decides to schedule an amniocentesis test. Doctors carefully screen her amniotic fluid sample, and they determine that her fetus has an extra 21st chromosome — in other words, the child will be born with Down syndrome. The patient instantly faces an emotional quandary: should she go forward with the pregnancy, or should she have an abortion? This kind of thorny ethical question was at the center of a forum on genetic disease forum held May 5 at the JCC in Manhattan.

Across The Great Divide

03/23/2007
Staff Writer
In a synagogue library in northern Westchester, a dozen senior citizens sit around a long table discussing current events. In a temple conference room on the Upper West Side, a young family talks about the tensions raised by a child’s serious illness. In the meeting room of a Long Island JCC, a group of recent widows share photographs and memories of their late husbands.

Job Losses Mount for Well-Off in Community

11/18/2009
Staff Writer

Bob S., a 50-year-old computer specialist from Scarsdale, was laid off from his $175,000-a-year job in March after years of steady employment. He, his wife and their two children began living off the family’s savings, canceled their vacation plans and began eating all their meals at home.

Job seekers line up in Midtown outside a job fair. Middle- and upper-middle-class Jewish men appear to be among the hardest hit

Gays Rituals Going Mainstream

08/01/2003
Staff Writer
Sarah and Michelle aren't getting married this summer; they're having a commitment ceremony. They are specifically not calling it a wedding and there will be no ketubah, marriage contract. Instead, they will participate in a Talmudic ritual that establishes business partnerships and outline their mutual responsibilities and commitment in a shtar, a Jewish legal document.

Across The Great Divide

03/16/2007
Staff Writer
In a synagogue library in northern Westchester, a dozen senior citizens sit around a long table discussing current events. In a temple conference room on the Upper West Side, a young family talks about the tensions raised by a child’s serious illness. In the meeting room of a Long Island JCC, a group of recent widows share photographs and memories of their late husbands.

Dwindling Days Of Awe

09/08/2004
Staff Writer
On Rosh HaShanah will be inscribed and on Yom Kippur will be sealed how many will pass from the earth and how many will be created, who will live and who will die … From the Rosh HaShanah liturgy On these summer days in the late autumn of his life, on the mornings when he feels strong enough, Harold Dubow opens a siddur. Waking late in a living room on the edge of Brooklyn’s Midwood neighborhood, he takes some pills, eats a small cereal breakfast and recites Shacharit from a large-print prayerbook he keeps nearby on a small table.

Budget Boosts Wars On Drugs, Domestic Abuse

08/13/1999
Staff Writer
Programs to combat domestic violence and drug abuse in the Jewish community were among the items in the state's $73.3 billion budget adopted last week by the state Legislature. "Drug abuse is becoming an increasing problem in the Jewish community," said Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver (D-Manhattan), who noted that he helped secure for Ohel Children's Home and Family Services in Brooklyn a $50,000 federal anti-drug grant, as well as several hundred thousand dollars in state money.
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