ovarian cancer

Battling Ovarian And Breast Cancer

Special To The Jewish Week
01/30/2009

Marcia Byalick was 38 years old when her mother died from ovarian cancer. Since then, she has lived with the fear that she and her daughters are at high risk of developing ovarian cancer. When Byalick recently learned of a new study focusing on breast and ovarian cancer among Jewish women, she was eager to participate.

Attacking Cancer At Its Roots

When her disease returned, the author’s aunt took matters (or scissors) into her own hands. The unlikeliest upsherin.

01/30/2009
Special To The Jewish Week
    I didn’t know what real loveliness was until I saw my Aunt Nomi in the hallway of Sloan Kettering Cancer Center wearing a visitor’s gown and a face mask.     “Where are you coming from?” I asked her. I had just left my grandfather’s room, Nomi’s father, when I saw her exiting a different room.

Battling Ovarian And Breast Cancer

New project aims to educate and to enlist thousands of Jewish women in a comprehensive study on genetic factors.

01/30/2009
Special To The Jewish Week
Marcia Byalick was 38 years old when her mother died from ovarian cancer. Since then, she has lived with the fear that she and her daughters are at high risk of developing ovarian cancer. When Byalick recently learned of a new study focusing on breast and ovarian cancer among Jewish women, she was eager to participate.

The (Jewish) Mother Of DNA

04/18/2003
Staff Writer
In March 1953, Maurice Wilkins of the King's College London announced the departure of his colleague Rosalind Franklin in a private letter to his friend Francis Crick, a scientist at the rival Cavendish Laboratory. "Our dark lady is leaving us next week," Wilkins wrote.

Making The Cut

05/15/2009
Staff Writer
A recent Facebook message from a total stranger, one of dozens and dozens Jessica Queller has received since she went public this year with an agonizingly personal medical decision, shared a familiar story. The stranger, a woman in her mid-30s, was a cancer survivor, unmarried, with no immediate matrimonial prospects. She wanted to have children. Queller understood.

Fighting The Odds

07/28/2006
Staff Writer
Last month, Barbara Pfeiffer had surgery to remove both her breasts. A year ago, she had a total hysterectomy, removing her uterus and ovaries. The 46-year-old has never been diagnosed with cancer. She had these healthy body parts surgically removed because she has a strong family history of cancer and a genetic mutation making it overwhelmingly likely that she would develop breast or ovarian cancer in her lifetime.

Making The Cut

05/13/2009
Staff Writer
A recent Facebook message from a total stranger, one of dozens and dozens Jessica Queller has received since she went public this year with an agonizingly personal medical decision, shared a familiar story. The stranger, a woman in her mid-30s, was a cancer survivor, unmarried, with no immediate matrimonial prospects. She wanted to have children. Queller understood.
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