cancer

Rifka’s Words Still Speak To Me

12/05/2007
Special To The Jewish Week
Almost a decade ago, before Facebook enabled us to be friends with people we’d never met, before blogs gave us front-row seats into the intimate lives of strangers, I was friends with Rifka Rosenwein.  

Newman’s Own Image-Changing Role

10/03/2008
Staff Writer
‘Exodus” was not an easy sell in 1960. When director Otto Preminger decided to adapt Leon Uris’ best-selling novel about the founding of Israel into a feature-length film, he ran into heavy resistance in Hollywood’s major studios. Too Jewish, too controversial, they said.

A Refuge For Hurting Families

10/31/2008
Staff Writer
Houston — Tzipora Mintz’s first concern when her husband learned he had to come here for medical treatment in early 2003 was his health. He had lymphoma, an advanced form of the cancer of the immune system.   Her second concern was housing. She and her husband — a young Orthodox couple from Brooklyn, they had recently had a new child — would be spending months, on and off, in Houston, while he received care at the Texas Medical Center.

The Idealism, And Realism, Of King Hussein

11/21/2008
Staff Writer
During the reign of King Hussein, Jordanian currency would be printed with an empty space next to the image of a prominent site or prominent citizen. Hold the dinar up to a light, and a faint picture of the king would appear.

The Idealism, And Realism, Of King Hussein

11/21/2008
Staff Writer
During the reign of King Hussein, Jordanian currency would be printed with an empty space next to the image of a prominent site or prominent citizen. Hold the dinar up to a light, and a faint picture of the king would appear.

Doctor Clown Healer

12/19/2008
Staff Writer
The most memorable incident in the life of 16-year-old Oopsie took place last year in a stranger’s hospital room in Israel. Oopsie is the non-de-plume of Zachy Adler, a yeshiva high school student from Woodmere, L.I., who, as a clown outfitted with makeup, red foam-rubber nose and floppy ears, entertains kids in hospitals and senior citizens in nursing homes in both Israel and the United States. Visiting Tel Aviv’s Tel HaShomer Hospital with a group of fellow young clowns from the New York area, he noticed a sad-looking girl sitting alone in an open room.

Making Peace With Killers

Sunday, December 6th, 2009

Some 15 years ago, while there were still high hopes for the Oslo peace process, I interviewed John Wallach, founder of Seeds for Peace.

 

His program bringing Arab and Jewish kids together for leadership training retreats and conflict resolution studies, a worthy and laudable undertaking, was a few years old at the time and Wallach was thrilled that a group of his alumni got to sit on the dais as Yitzchak Rabin and Yasir Arafat signed papers and shook hands, raising what would shortly turn out to be false hopes around the world.

You Don’t Look Like A Marine...

03/20/2009
Staff Writer
A few hours after a U.S. Army base in Iraq came under Iranian-backed Shi’ite rocket attacks the other day, Dave Rosner and a few friends showed up. Rosner, a lieutenant colonel in the Marine Corps Reserves, wasn’t there to fight. He went to tell jokes. Rosner, a wiry, wisecracking native of New Mexico who now lives on the Upper East Side, was part of a stand-up show that entertains troops in war zones. This one was especially tense after the rocket attack, one in which an injured soldier had to be airlifted away for medical care.

O'Connor Backs Forest For Pope

03/10/2000
Staff Writer
As ailing 80-year-old New York Archbishop John Cardinal O'Connor continues to battle the effects of cancer radiation treatment, he can still "see" the trees: and the forest. O'Connor continued his unprecedented record of improving Christian-Jewish relations with his support of a project to plant a forest in Israel honoring Pope John Paul II. The project to plant 25,000 trees in Nazareth is being sponsored by the Center for Christian-Jewish Understanding of Sacred Heart University in Connecticut, along with the Jewish National Fund.

The Book On Coping

05/15/2009
Staff Writer
Physical maladies, psychological illness, financial difficulties — these are pervasive in contemporary society and seem to be becoming more prevalent. And so are books meant to help people navigate through these choppy emotional waters. Judaism has answers for these problems: not a single, monolithic answer, but responses as varied as the Jewish people themselves. Here are some current answers:
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