breast cancer

Making The Cut

Staff Writer
A recent Facebook message from a total stranger, one of dozens and dozens Jessica Queller has received since she went public this year with an agonizingly personal medical decision, shared a familiar story. The stranger, a woman in her mid-30s, was a cancer survivor, unmarried, with no immediate matrimonial prospects. She wanted to have children. Queller understood.

Pink Ribbons In Once-Red Europe

Staff Writer
In Russia, a three-day gathering of physicians and breast cancer survivors. In Hungary, a nationwide breast cancer screening program. In Bosnia-Herzegovina, a breast cancer hot line.   Four years after the American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee joined the Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation in a series of pilot advocacy and educational programs in three former Iron Curtain countries, tens of thousands of women are learning to take their health, literally, into their own hands, leaders of the initiative say.

Armed With The Facts

Staff Writer
With evidence suggesting that Ashkenazi Jewish women are five to 10 times more likely than other women to be born with a mutant gene associated with breast cancer, Columbia Universityís College of Physicians and Surgeons is preparing a booklet to help such women decide whether to undergo genetic testing. "There are legal and social issues that a woman may wish to consider," said Sherry Brandt-Rauf, associate research scholar at the schoolís Center for the Study of Society and Medicine.

Obama stem cell order unites Jewish groups

Monday, March 9th, 2009 James Besser in Washington Update: The Insider apparently wasn’t inside enough; also present at the White House stem cell signing was Rabbi Steve Gutow, executive director of the Jewish Council for Public Affairs (JCPA) The Jewish community from right to left was represented at  Monday’s White House ceremony marking President Barack Obama’s executive order rescinding his predecessors strict limits on stem cell research.
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