breast cancer

Battling Ovarian And Breast Cancer

Special To The Jewish Week
01/30/2009

Marcia Byalick was 38 years old when her mother died from ovarian cancer. Since then, she has lived with the fear that she and her daughters are at high risk of developing ovarian cancer. When Byalick recently learned of a new study focusing on breast and ovarian cancer among Jewish women, she was eager to participate.

Battling Ovarian And Breast Cancer

New project aims to educate and to enlist thousands of Jewish women in a comprehensive study on genetic factors.

01/30/2009
Special To The Jewish Week
Marcia Byalick was 38 years old when her mother died from ovarian cancer. Since then, she has lived with the fear that she and her daughters are at high risk of developing ovarian cancer. When Byalick recently learned of a new study focusing on breast and ovarian cancer among Jewish women, she was eager to participate.

Searching For The Right Genes

Staff Writer
10/20/2009
Women with breast cancer have seen a modest increase in survival rates over the past decade, as both prophylactic and combative treatment options become more widely available, and as expertise in genetics and molecular biology continue to expand on the clinical level.

Navigating The Shoals Of Breast Cancer

10/29/2008
Staff Writer
In the early 1990s, two oncologists — troubled by how frustrated and confused their newly-diagnosed breast cancer patients felt — decided to comprehensively address their lists of unanswered questions. The doctors teamed up to publish the first edition of a guidebook to breast cancer in 1992.

Next-Gen Cellphones To Have Israeli Ring

07/09/2008
Staff Writer
Take a good, hard look at the cellphone in your pocket. Whether you’re an avid text messager or you’ve only recently learned how to change your ring tone to something snazzy, be forewarned. Within the next year or two, your cellphone will undergo such a radical transformation that you’ll view the phone you’re currently carrying around as terribly passé. And impersonal, too.      At least that’s what dozens of Israeli startups — and their funders —are betting on.   

Remembering Barbie's Jewish Mother

05/03/2002
Staff Writer
Ruth Moskowitz was the youngest of 10 children born to Polish-Jewish immigrant parents Jacob and Ida. Little did they imagine that their baby daughter would grow up to create one of America's most popular icons. As the creator of the Barbie doll and co-founder of the Mattel Toy Corp., Ruth became one of the country's most enterprising and powerful businesswomen.

'Honey Did It All'

08/08/2003
Staff Writer
In October 1979, Honey Rackman was asked to help a friend whose daughter was being denied a "get," or Jewish divorce. A group of Modern Orthodox women held a meeting in their Flatbush, Brooklyn, neighborhood to discuss how to help. Since then she became a tireless advocate for "agunot," or "chained women," whose husbands refuse to grant their wives a religious divorce, leaving them in a kind of purgatory.

DNA Analysis, Direct To You

05/14/2008
Staff Writer
It had big-money marketing written all over it. Every detail in the Soho gallery space was futuristically sleek and designed to impress the New Yorkers who, the company hoped, would be sold on shelling out $2,499 to get their DNA tested for 18 disease predispositions — but only after they enjoyed fresh pomegranate juice or a “Navitini,” a cocktail created for the occasion. Munching on healthy hors d’hoevres, several dozen people milled among the computer monitors showing Navigenics videos of happy customers.

Making The Cut

05/15/2009
Staff Writer
A recent Facebook message from a total stranger, one of dozens and dozens Jessica Queller has received since she went public this year with an agonizingly personal medical decision, shared a familiar story. The stranger, a woman in her mid-30s, was a cancer survivor, unmarried, with no immediate matrimonial prospects. She wanted to have children. Queller understood.

Fighting The Odds

07/28/2006
Staff Writer
Last month, Barbara Pfeiffer had surgery to remove both her breasts. A year ago, she had a total hysterectomy, removing her uterus and ovaries. The 46-year-old has never been diagnosed with cancer. She had these healthy body parts surgically removed because she has a strong family history of cancer and a genetic mutation making it overwhelmingly likely that she would develop breast or ovarian cancer in her lifetime.
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