Rosh HaShanah

How To Arrange To Hear The Shofar

09/11/2009
Staff Writer
Rabbi Kasriel Kastel tells of a Jewish family he knew in the Bronx years ago. They couldn’t afford to join a synagogue. So they didn’t go to High Holy Days services. Instead, on one day of Rosh HaShanah each year, they would go to a body of water and do Tashlich, the symbol casting away of sins. “Tashlich is free,” the rabbi says. The children “keep up the tradition.”

How To Arrange To Hear The Shofar

09/11/2009
Staff Writer
Rabbi Kasriel Kastel tells of a Jewish family he knew in the Bronx years ago. They couldn’t afford to join a synagogue. So they didn’t go to High Holy Days services. Instead, on one day of Rosh HaShanah each year, they would go to a body of water and do Tashlich, the symbol casting away of sins. “Tashlich is free,” the rabbi says. The children “keep up the tradition.”

High, Holy & Hip

09/03/1999
Staff Writer
Harry met Sally there. Avant-garde artists exhibit their paintings on its walls. Haute couture models sashay on its fashion show runways. And next week, for the first time, the shofar will sound in the Puck Building, a Manhattan landmark in SoHo. Aish New York, the local branch of the Jerusalem-based Aish HaTorah yeshiva, will host High Holy Days beginner's services in one of the building's ballrooms.

How To Arrange To Hear The Shofar

09/11/2009
Staff Writer
Rabbi Kasriel Kastel tells of a Jewish family he knew in the Bronx years ago. They couldn’t afford to join a synagogue. So they didn’t go to High Holy Days services. Instead, on one day of Rosh HaShanah each year, they would go to a body of water and do Tashlich, the symbol casting away of sins. “Tashlich is free,” the rabbi says. The children “keep up the tradition.”

How To Arrange To Hear The Shofar

09/11/2009
Staff Writer
Rabbi Kasriel Kastel tells of a Jewish family he knew in the Bronx years ago. They couldn’t afford to join a synagogue. So they didn’t go to High Holy Days services. Instead, on one day of Rosh HaShanah each year, they would go to a body of water and do Tashlich, the symbol casting away of sins. “Tashlich is free,” the rabbi says. The children “keep up the tradition.”

‘If You Stream It, They Will Come’

09/18/2009
Staff Writer
Lisa Gilbert, a native of Cincinnati who now lives in Manhattan, listened to the rabbi’s sermon and the choir’s singing at her family’s Cincinnati congregation on the High Holy Days last year. From her New York apartment. Online. Gilbert, a 30-year-old research analyst, watched the live streaming Rosh HaShanah and Yom Kippur services of Congregation Beth Adam, on the humanistic synagogue’s Web site, because she had attended several congregations after moving here and did not feel welcome or comfortable at any one of them.

High Holy Days Come To Kabul

09/25/2009
Staff Writer
The entire Jewish community of Afghanistan celebrated Rosh HaShanah this week in a small side room of the lone synagogue in Kabul, the country’s capital. His name is Zebulon Simantov. Simantov, 57, a one-time owner of a small jewelry-and-carpets store in Kabul, returned a decade ago to Afghanistan, his homeland, after spending time in Tajikistan and Israel.

A Class Clown Eyes The A-List

10/02/2009
Staff Writer
Stand-up comic Ray Ellin was performing at a New York comedy club a few days after Rosh HaShanah. It was his usual act — some family stories, some bantering with the audience. As usual, he asked people in the crowd where they came from. “Germany,” said one couple. That’s raw meat for a Jewish comic. “I wish you,” Ellin said, “a year of health and happiness — and reparations.” “It killed — killed,” Ellin says. The crowd roared.

Reading Palms

10/06/2006
Staff Writer
Come Sukkot, you can buy your lulav and etrog online. Just visit esrogim.com or gotesrog.com. But if you favor a more tactile experience, you shlep to a Jewish bookstore, or to a street-side stand in a Jewish neighborhood and pick out a set of the Arba Minim, the Four Species, yourself.

Tashlich In Uman

09/29/2006
Staff Writer
According to local memory, thousands of Jewish men, women and children were executed by Nazi soldiers at the edge of a reservoir in Uman, a village in Ukraine, during the Holocaust. More than six decades later, Jews from around the world (nearly all of them men) are returning Jewish life to Uman. For the last 20 years, chasidic Jews and other Orthodox Jews from Israel, the United States and other countries have congregated for Rosh HaShanah in Uman, where Rabbi Nachman of Bratslav, an early chasidic leader, is buried. The rabbi died there in 1810.
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