Passover

A Modern Passover Story In Egypt

An unexpected question confronts
a pair of Jewish visitors in Cairo.

03/24/2010
Special To The Jewish Weekv

The initial plan was spectacular. While studying at Hebrew University in 1990, Arie Katz, a Princeton grad who currently serves as the chair of the Orange County Community Scholar Program in California, and I journeyed from Israel to Egypt the week before Passover to tour and admire our ancestors’ handiwork, otherwise known as the pyramids.

Old memories come out of storage each year.The Pesach Dishes

03/24/2010
Special To The Jewish Week

Like the children of Israel leaving Egypt, the dishes emerge from the darkness of the Rubbermaid bins at the back of my garage, launching a reunion with long-gone relatives who come rushing across the parted sea into my patient, waiting arms. Slowly, I unfurl the newspaper wrapping and announce Pesach’s arrival in my home.
 

Clean SweepA feminist finds spiritual meaning in what she had seen as drudgery.

03/24/2010
Special To The Jewish Week

When I was a child, I watched my mother turn our New York suburban home upside down during her zealous Pesach cleaning. Later, as a young feminist, I resented the fact that my mother (with the help of our house cleaner) did all the cleaning and cooking before the seders, while my father led the ritual aspect of these meals.
 
I saw my mother as enslaved to an exaggerated notion of the halachic requirement to rid one’s home of chametz, which I thought was totally antithetical to the notion of Pesach as a holiday of freedom.
 

The Fifth Son

In those long-ago seders, who were the drab Peshevorskys,
and why were they at our table?

03/24/2010
Special To The Jewish Week

Their name was pronounced Peshevorsky. I have no idea how it was spelled. Neither do I know their first names. I addressed them as “Mr. and Mrs. Peshevorsky.” It was such a mouthful, I had to practice saying it before they arrived.

They only joined us for the seders. It was, however, a perennial visit. Their presence defined Passover as certainly as the presence of a lulav and esrog defined Sukkot. The difference was, a lulav and esrog were more animated.

Honoring A Legacy With Words And Deeds

Passover chesed project, day of study and park
walkway are tributes to the memory of Scarsdale’s Deborah and Rabbi Jacob Rubenstein.

03/23/2010
Special To The Jewish Week

Young Israel of Scarsdale fairly hummed with purposeful activity last Sunday morning. In the social hall, groups of pre-teens and teenagers, assisted by several sets of parents, carefully helped younger children paint seder plates, decorate pillow covers and afikomen bags, and embellish Elijah cups.
 

YU President Richard Joel spoke at last week's event, top The sign marking the new walkway. Photos by Jeffrey Alan Steinberg

Sabbath Week: Time Out For Passover

03/23/2010
Special To The Jewish Week

Candlelighting, Readings:
Candles: 6:56 p.m. (Fri.); 6:59 p.m. (Mon.);
7:59 p.m. (Tue.)
Torah reading: Leviticus 6:1-8:36
Haftarah: Malachi 3:4-3:24
Shabbat ends: 7:55 p.m.
Chametz: eat before 10:55 a.m.; burn before 11:57 a.m. (Mon.)

 

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The Making Of Passover Heroes

When I was a kid, I'd  often spend the Sunday before Passover with other yeshiva kids packing up boxes full of matzah, eggs, grape, juice, gefilte fish and other staples to help the needy observe Passover.

Special Section: Passover, 5770 - a Taste of Freedom

03/19/2010

Elegant macarons, against the grain with quinoa, kosher wines on the rebound, cool gifts for kids and much more.

 

Art by Debbie Richman

Seder Shopping Is In Order

03/18/2010

 

 

 
For many seder participants, there is a Fifth Question each year — what new Haggadah do I want to buy this year, or what new seder plate, or what new artistic item for my yom tov table?
 
The answer — even in this age of online commerce — often comes in a Jewish gift shop and/or bookstore.
 
At Manhattan Judaica in Midtown, some shoppers started their Pesach shopping this week, looking at the latest Haggadahs and seder plates.
 

Photo By Michael Datikash

Child Nutrition Seders to Raise Awareness, Advocate for Funding

03/18/2010
Special to the Jewish Week

The Passover story is about the Jewish people gaining their freedom from slavery in Egypt. This year, two Jewish groups are connecting the holiday to a campaign to free American children from the bondage of hunger.

The Jewish Council for Public Affairs and Mazon: A Jewish Response to Hunger are helping communities around the country hold a “Child Nutrition Seder” to both raise awareness of the issue of proper childhood nutrition and build support for the reauthorization of congressional legislation providing billions of dollars for federal nutrition programs.

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