May Day

Law Day and the US Senate

04/27/2010
Special to the Jewish Week

May 1 was proclaimed Law Day in 1958 by President Eisenhower, in an explicit effort to pre-empt the celebration of May Day as an international worker's holiday - one that honored the struggle for the eight-hour day begun in the US. But the celebration of the rule of law and observance of the struggle for workers' rights are not necessarily at odds. After all, it is through the democratic enactment of laws that our rights are made real. In our system, those laws are judged to be in accord with the protections of our Constitution - or not - by impartial courts.

Laboring For A Settlement

05/08/1998
Staff Writer
The American Jewish Committee is grappling with internal labor unrest that threatens to mar its showcase annual meeting in Washington, D.C., next week featuring Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu. About 75 AJCommittee senior staff professionals nationwide staged a one-day May Day work stoppage to show their frustration with stalled contract negotiations since the last three-year pact expired in December.

Still Marching For The Cause

09/03/2004
Staff Writer
It was close to 70 years ago that Evelyn Chasan bought a sharp royal-blue suit with a boxy jacket at Klein’s, the fabled department store on Union Square, and wore it to a May Day rally in support of unions and workers’ rights in the adjacent park. The memory came back to her on Sunday as she joined hundreds of thousands of others to march in sweltering heat and demonstrate deep opposition to the re-election of President George W. Bush.
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