World Trade Center

Ah, Liver Knishes

11/15/2002
Staff Writer
Dining out is an obsession (a religious experience?) for many New Yorkers. For William Grimes, it's a profession.  

Jersey Poet Laureate Unrepentant

09/27/2002
Staff Writer
Newark, N.J. — Controversial New Jersey poet laureate Amiri Baraka, whose recent poem “Somebody Blew Up America” suggested that Israel knew in advance about the Sept. 11 terror attacks, blasted his Jewish critics Wednesday, calling the Anti-Defamation League “the voice of imperialism.” Baraka is refusing to resign his post despite calls from New Jersey Gov. James McGreevey that he step down, adding Wednesday, “I will not apologize.”

Art After The Crime

09/21/2001
Staff Writer
In the aftermath of last week’s deadly terror attack, all eyes focused on the fervent rescue effort in Lower Manhattan. With thousands of people buried under mountains of steel and concrete, cultural enterprise suddenly seemed frivolous and art openings, lectures, parties and awards ceremonies nationwide were canceled or postponed.

Cooling The Campus Heat

05/10/2002
Staff Writer
New York University's Office of Student Life was the scene of a peace negotiation last week that Colin Powell can only dream about. On one side of Sally Arthur, assistant vice president for student life, sat two leaders of a pro-Israel Jewish student group called TorchPAC. On the other side sat two officials from the pro-Palestinian Arab Student Union, the largest Arab student group at the Greenwich Village institution.

Healing The Healers

06/28/2002
Staff Writer
New York City area clergy are in danger of burning out as they try to keep up with the unprecedented demand for spiritual counsel from hundreds of thousands of residents traumatized from Sept. 11. And the mental health of both clergy and 9-11 survivors is expected to worsen in the coming months from the continued stress and delayed emotional reactions.

More Free-Speech Furor In N.J.

07/25/2003
Staff Writer
When New Jersey Gov. James McGreevey didn't like what state Poet Laureate Amiri Baraka had to say about Israelis in a poem about 9-11, he took action. McGreevey, with the nearly unanimous support of the state Legislature, abolished the state-funded post through budget cuts several weeks ago to get rid of Baraka. In recent weeks McGreevey has said he didn't like the "abhorrent" views of a Rutgers University pro-Palestinian student group that is sponsoring a national conference in October at the state-financed institution.

Death Camp Dispute

07/11/2003
Staff Writer
How best to honor the memory of half a million Jews buried in the horrific and long-neglected Belzec death camp in southeastern Poland? That's the heart of a running dispute pitting several rabbis and Jewish organizations that support the approved design plan against New York activist Rabbi Avi Weiss, who insists the plan desecrates the victims and violates Jewish law. The dispute echoes the debate in New York City over the memorial for the Sept. 11 World Trade Center victims.

Stress On The Strasse

03/07/2003
Staff Writer
Berlin: It was a scene dripping with historical irony. On a street in this transformed former capital of Nazi Germany, a German man this week approached Philadelphia Rabbi Jacob Herber, here as part of a delegation of American spiritual leaders, and advised him to remove his kipa, fearing for his safety. "He said, 'Sir, do you have to wear that,' " Rabbi Herber related. "It's very dangerous here because of Muslims." "I was surprised," the rabbi said. "The fact that a German is protecting a Jew from a Muslim was unexpected."

A Day For Lamentations

09/06/2002
Staff Writer
Two days after Rosh HaShanah this year comes another Yom HaZikaron. The first anniversary of the attack on America occurs during the Jewish Days of Repentance (the Jewish New Year is traditionally referred to by its Hebrew name, the day of memorial) and the Jewish community will join all Americans in honoring the memory of the 3,000 victims of Sept. 11, 2001.

Not Everyone Has 'Moved On'

09/05/2003
Staff Writer
Lauren put on her makeup the other day. She dressed appropriately for her meeting, left her apartment, and showed up on time at an office near Greenwich Village. It sounds like an ordinary day. But for Lauren, a 39-year-old artist who lost most of her business on 9-11 and was displaced for several months from her home near the World Trade Center, it was extraordinary.
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