Twin Towers

When In Jewish Rome...

Five Towns teens participate in unique exchange program with Orthodox Jewish Italian peers.
03/23/2010 - 20:00
Special To The Jewish Week

‘Curious” was the word 17-year-old Blake Schulman used to describe how she felt as she left her home on Long Island for a week in Italy.
 
“I knew that the Italian kids were Orthodox, but I learned that they were so different than the Orthodox we know in the Five Towns,” she said.
 
After living in Rome with 16-year-old Giorgia Del Monte and her family, Blake said, “It was one of the best experiences of my life.”
 

The Long Island and Roman students pose atop the Renzo Levi Yeshiva, with the Vatican in the background.

Art After The Crime

09/20/2001 - 20:00
Staff Writer

In the aftermath of last week’s deadly terror attack, all eyes focused on the fervent rescue effort in Lower Manhattan. With thousands of people buried under mountains of steel and concrete, cultural enterprise suddenly seemed frivolous and art openings, lectures, parties and awards ceremonies nationwide were canceled or postponed.

Moving On To The Next Tragedy

Staff Writer
09/21/2009 - 20:00
Eight years after the Twin Towers crumbled over downtown Manhattan, rescue worker Charlie Giles still wakes up regularly with nightmares of the North Tower collapsing on top of him, enveloping his body his flames and in suffocating debris. One night recently, he even woke up to find himself throwing things. “I said to my wife, ‘He’s in our room, he’s in our room,’” Giles remembers. “She said, ‘Who’s in our room?’ I said, ‘bin Laden.’”

Art After The Crime

09/20/2001 - 20:00
Staff Writer
In the aftermath of last week’s deadly terror attack, all eyes focused on the fervent rescue effort in Lower Manhattan. With thousands of people buried under mountains of steel and concrete, cultural enterprise suddenly seemed frivolous and art openings, lectures, parties and awards ceremonies nationwide were canceled or postponed.

A Shot Of Unity

10/10/2002 - 20:00
Staff Writer
George Kalinsky was seething inside. A fervently Orthodox rabbi told him that he wasn’t a real Jew. Never mind that Kalinsky’s parents were Jewish and that he put on tefillin every morning. Kalinsky, the longtime photographer extraordinaire for Madison Square Garden, who captured the magic of the Willis Reed/Walt Frazier-era championship Knick teams and who took the last photo of John Lennon performing live, apparently wasn’t observing rituals to the Agudath Israel rabbi’s standards.
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