Rego Park

A Museum Grows In Queens

03/01/2002
Staff Writer
A visit to Bukharian New York, an area that stretches along Queens Boulevard from Rego Park through Forest Hills to Kew Gardens, is not complete without the consumption of regional delicacies, insists Aron Aronov. But for this community activist, who has a Bukharian Jewish museum stashed in his cellar, a pit stop at the Uzbekistan Tandoori Bread shop on 83rd Avenue quickly becomes an opportunity for kibitzing more than noshing.

Judges: Deri Turned On N.Y. Benefactors

03/26/1999
Staff Writer
She was an elderly, recently widowed Holocaust survivor living out what would be the last months of her life in a small Rego Park flat still haunted with memories of her husband. But as the investigation of Israeli Interior Minister and Sephardi kingmaker Aryeh Deri intensified in Jerusalem, it was Esther Werderber of Queens, strangely enough, who came under crushing pressure.

More Kosher Soup Kitchens Aiding The Newly Poor as Recession Impact Deepens

New centers to open in Brooklyn, Queens as need soars for struggling families.

11/11/2009

The storefront on Lee Avenue had yet to open for “business” last Wednesday evening when a large, hungry crowd filed in and found places at its brand-new tables.

Some 30 families — some of whose breadwinners have lost jobs in the recession and are struggling to make ends meet — had been invited to inaugurate the Masbia kosher soup kitchen in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, the first operatedby the Metropolitan Council on Jewish Poverty. They consumed 120 meals of breaded chicken, mashed potatoes and vegetables.

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Redemption In Rego Park

03/27/2002
Staff Writer
Marilyn Schapiro found redemption in Rego Park last Friday, just days before sitting down at a Passover seder to recall that of her ancestors in a different land. Schapiro, 58, was to be evicted from her longtime home on Wednesday, for non-payment of rent. “I was very worried,” said Schapiro, who has paid her rent out of disability payments since being laid off from her garment center job four years ago, and after being injured in a fall shortly after that. “I don’t know where I would go.

A Helping Hand

06/23/2006
Staff Writer
The news was devastating. Sandi Frank and her husband, Kenneth, had just been told that a rare form of cancer was spreading through the body of their 9-month-old son, Max. Beside themselves, they reached out to family and friends for support. One of those friends turned to Lori Hardoon, director of the Partners in Dignity Program, who immediately drove from her office in Syosset to Schneider Children's Hospital in New Hyde Park, where the Franks were caring for their son.
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