Nozyk Synagogue

‘We Lost A Friend’

Polish president, victim of plane crash in Russia,
had close ties to the Jewish community.

04/13/2010
Special to The Jewish Week

Note: The Polish people suffered a loss when President Lech Kaczynski, his wife, and 94 other passengers on a Russian jet, including many top Polish officials, were killed in a crash Saturday near Smolensk, Russia. Jewish leaders in Poland praised Kaczynski, 60, as a true friend of the Jewish community and Israel, and participants in the annual March of the Living wore black armbands this week in the president’s memory.

Late Polish President Lech Kaczynki, right, with Polish Chief Rabbi Michael Schudrich at Chanukah celebration in Warsaw shul.

Poland Calls His Name

09/29/2000
Staff Writer
Since returning to Poland last June to serve as chief rabbi of Warsaw, Rabbi Michael Shudrich has been busy trying to resolve the country’s Jewish past, and also secure its future. One moment he’s ensuring that the community has kosher food. The next, he’s trying to save abandoned Jewish cemeteries and mass grave sites left in ruins after World War II. Perhaps most importantly, the short, bearded 45-year-old Bronx-born and Patchogue, L.I.-raised rabbi is trying to help Poles with Jewish roots return to Judaism.

A Jewish Tree Grows In Poland?

09/10/1999
Staff Writer
Warsaw, Poland — Konstanty Gebert likes to compare this city’s fledgling Jewish community to a sapling cut from a tree, replanted, and now forging its own identity. What this journalist and Jewish community leader doesn’t like are Jewish critics who state that Poland’s struggling Jewish community is irrelevant or dead. Like the famous Mark Twain quip, Gebert insists that such reports are highly exaggerated.

In The Bat Mitzvah Spirit

06/17/2005
Staff Writer
Among the concerns for the Lippmans of the Upper East Side in planning their daughter Juliet's bat mitzvah last fall was how to give the occasion some spiritual significance. "What should we do so it's not just a party?" Marie Lippman asked a friend, Rabbi Adina Lewittes of Tenafly, N.J., over lunch at a Midtown restaurant a few months before the bat mitzvah. Rabbi Lewittes answered by telling a story she had just read in Rabbi Daniel Gordis' on-line column from Israel.

In The Bat Mitzvah Spirit

06/17/2005
Staff Writer
Among the concerns for the Lippmans of the Upper East Side in planning their daughter Juliet's bat mitzvah last fall was how to give the occasion some spiritual significance. "What should we do so it's not just a party?" Marie Lippman asked a friend, Rabbi Adina Lewittes of Tenafly, N.J., over lunch at a Midtown restaurant a few months before the bat mitzvah. Rabbi Lewittes answered by telling a story she had just read in Rabbi Daniel Gordis' on-line column from Israel.
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