Jewish Museum

Cross To Bear

08/06/1999
Staff Writer
In 1971, Ronald Brown visited Prague for the first time and was disturbed by what he saw at the famous 500-year-old Charles Bridge: a centuries-old crucifixion statue framed by one of Judaism's most sacred prayers. The then-25-year-old rabbinical student at Hebrew Union College was upset by the symbolism of the Hebrew inscription in relation to the cross. The quote was taken from the prophet Isaiah ("Holy Holy Holy is the Lord of Hosts") which the angels chant to praise God, according to Jewish tradition.

‘Source Of Inspiration’

12/10/2008
Staff Writer
Richard Scheuer, a real estate executive and philanthropist who spent his retirement years in Jewish communal affairs, as an active supporter of several Reform institutions, Israeli archaeology and The Jewish Museum, died on Nov. 7. A resident of Larchmont, he was 91, and succumbed to heart failure after surgery.

Cracking The Glass Ceiling

10/06/2000
Staff Writer
Citing a "glass ceiling" in Jewish communal life that has prevented women from advancing to leadership positions in national Jewish organizations and large city federations, the newly created Trust for Jewish Philanthropy has announced that its first initiative will be to tackle the gender gap. To help the project get off the ground, the philanthropist Barbara Dobkin, who founded and chairs Ma'yan, the Jewish Women's Project of the JCC of the Upper West Side, said she and her husband, Eric, are donating $1 million in seed money.

For German Converts, A New Home for the Soul

04/14/2009
Staff Writer

Trekking through ice-coated fields in a brutally cold Russian October, Lt. Arthur Wollschlaeger pressed on, as he and his swastika-emblazoned companions conquered the western Russian city of Orel — another victory for the unrelenting German Werhmacht infantry. He had earlier taken part in invasions of Poland, Holland and France — a World War II military career that began when he first entered the Czechoslovakian Sudetenland, in 1938.

Bernd Wollschlaeger, carrying the Torah, broke from his parents to become a Jew.
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