Jewish Museum

Rashi Brings A Record

01/17/2003
Staff Writer
The gavel came down on impressive auctions of Judaica last month, including the record-setting sale of a rare biblical commentary dated 1457. That Italian manuscript of writings by Solomon Ben Issac, the 11th-century French rabbi and commentator known as Rashi, eventually sold to a private buyer who phoned in the winning bid of $434,000. The Dec. 17 sale represented the highest price ever achieved by the auction house, Kestenbaum & Company, for a single lot.

Faith In Abstraction

10/24/2002
Staff Writer
Museum Mile — the stretch of Fifth Avenue from 82nd Street to 104th — offers an intriguing paradox this fall. The Jewish Museum, at the corner of 92nd Street, is presenting a retrospective of works by a Jewish painter who eschewed Jewish imagery in his embrace of the universal. A few blocks south, the National Academy of Design exhibits the work of a painter who rejected Judaism, but uses explicitly Jewish symbols as expressions of spiritual transcendence.

Klezmer City

09/27/2002
Staff Writer
Constanza Garcia was looking to book New York performances for “Klezmer en Buenos Aires” — a tango-inflected klezmer duo that she promotes. She immediately thought of Makor, the cultural center on the Upper West Side that caters to Jews in their 20s and 30s. “I thought Makor would be the right place for klezmer,” Garcia says. But Makor passed.

Lens Of The City

05/03/2002
Staff Writer
Hoping to stir up a little debate on a somewhat taboo topic, art critic Max Kozloff has mounted a historical exhibition of street photography that dares to define a Jewish aesthetic. "New York: Capital of Photography," at The Jewish Museum through September, argues that there're two kinds of New York photography: Jewish and gentile. "It's totally provocative," Kozloff says, chuckling to himself during an interview at the press opening.

Hot Issues, Cool Art

03/01/2002
Staff Writer
There were plenty of words last Sunday morning on East 92nd Street, but not the sort The Jewish Museum had hoped for when it planned a provocative exhibition of contemporary art meant to rekindle dialogue about Holocaust memory. About 100 yeshiva students, politicians, Holocaust survivors and other community members, most of them from Brooklyn, directed chants of “Shame on You” and “Don’t go in” toward anyone who approached the museum’s front doors at the 10 a.m. opening of “Mirroring Evil: Nazi Imagery/Recent Art.”

Survivors: Museum Compromise

03/01/2002
Staff Writer
The Jewish Museum blinked. But it wasn’t enough to placate critics of its controversial exhibition, “Mirroring Evil: Nazi Imagery/Recent Art,” set to open in nine days.

Showdown At Jewish Museum

03/01/2002
Staff Writer
In an encounter billed by Dov Hikind as pained outer-borough survivors against uptown intellectuals, a dozen Holocaust survivors and children of survivors were to express their anger in a private meeting Wednesday morning at The Jewish Museum.

Nazi Artist, Muted Opening

02/15/2002
Staff Writer
A month after controversy engulfed The Jewish Museum’s upcoming exhibition of Nazi imagery in contemporary art, the real thing is now on display in a Chelsea gallery. Scheduling Leni Riefenstahl’s first New York solo show of photographs from “Olympia,” her film about the 1936 Berlin Games, to coincide with the Salt Lake Olympic Games, gallery owners Marianne Boesky and Marla Hamburg Kennedy are now scrambling to soften the impact of their exhibition of Hitler’s favorite filmmaker.

Nazi Art/Mediocre Draw

04/12/2002
Staff Writer
Despite a public outcry from Holocaust survivors and a nearly universal dismissal from art critics, the public has not stayed away from The Jewish Museum’s controversial exhibition “Mirroring Evil: Nazi Imagery/Recent Art.” Nor have they come out in droves. The widespread mass media coverage prior to the March 17 opening has surprisingly lead to no great surge or decline in attendance.

‘Source Of Inspiration’

12/12/2008
Staff Writer
Richard Scheuer, a real estate executive and philanthropist who spent his retirement years in Jewish communal affairs, as an active supporter of several Reform institutions, Israeli archaeology and The Jewish Museum, died on Nov. 7. A resident of Larchmont, he was 91, and succumbed to heart failure after surgery.
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