Holocaust Memorial Museum

Museum Launches Fund To Honor Slain Guard

04/27/2010

(JTA) — The U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum has established an endowment fund in memory of Stephen Tyrone Johns was gunned down last June 10 by 88-year-old white supremacist James Wenneker von Brunn of Maryland during an attempted raid on the museum. Johns died from his injuries shortly after the attack.
 

Nazi Artist, Muted Opening

02/15/2002
Staff Writer

A month after controversy engulfed The Jewish Museum’s upcoming exhibition of Nazi imagery in contemporary art, the real thing is now on display in a Chelsea gallery.

Scheduling Leni Riefenstahl’s first New York solo show of photographs from “Olympia,” her film about the 1936 Berlin Games, to coincide with the Salt Lake Olympic Games, gallery owners Marianne Boesky and Marla Hamburg Kennedy are now scrambling to soften the impact of their exhibition of Hitler’s favorite filmmaker.

French Proposal Stirs Split Reaction Here

02/27/2008
Special To The Jewish Week

David Marwell, director of New York’s Museum of Jewish Heritage, is among that small, but notable, group of historians and scholars whose career focus is on examining the Holocaust, making some sense of it, and conveying its lessons more than 60 years later.

But learned as Marwell  is in the field,  he avoided introducing his own children to the full horror of the Holocaust until he considered them old enough to absorb it.

A Friendly Visitor

Program links volunteers
with elderly Holocaust survivors.

02/11/2010
Staff Writer

As Sandra Glicksman walked towards the private room of Inge Heilbrunn in the Grace Plaza Nursing Center in Great Neck, Heilbrunn was in a wheelchair anxiously awaiting her arrival.

Heilbrunn, an 85-year-old widow and Holocaust survivor, was visibly upset. Jewelry that she had kept in her Scrabble box was missing.
“I’ve looked all over,” Heilbrunn said, beside herself. “It’s gone. Somebody took it. ... It meant a lot to me.”

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The Way They Lived

11/20/1998
Jewish Week Book Critic

One of the most striking exhibits in the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C., is the three towers of photographs taken in Eishyshok, documenting that shtetl’s Jewish life before it was destroyed by the Nazis. Viewers are encircled by 1,600 photographs collected by Dr. Yaffa Eliach, a professor at Brooklyn College who was born in Eishyshok. Now, Eliach has published a book that links together the moments captured in the photographs, presenting a full and textured description of the once vital community: It is a work about one town, with clues to many pasts.

A Shtetl Grows In Israel

06/06/2003
Staff Writer
A different kind of settlement activity took place Sunday outside Rishon Lezion, Israel's fourth-largest city. June 1 marked the groundbreaking for the Shtetl, the latest project by Holocaust survivor and historian Yaffa Eliach. Seven miles southeast of Tel Aviv, in the heart of the Jewish homeland, Eliach plans to recreate her Lithuanian hometown of Eishyshok.

Nazi Artist, Muted Opening

02/15/2002
Staff Writer
A month after controversy engulfed The Jewish Museum’s upcoming exhibition of Nazi imagery in contemporary art, the real thing is now on display in a Chelsea gallery. Scheduling Leni Riefenstahl’s first New York solo show of photographs from “Olympia,” her film about the 1936 Berlin Games, to coincide with the Salt Lake Olympic Games, gallery owners Marianne Boesky and Marla Hamburg Kennedy are now scrambling to soften the impact of their exhibition of Hitler’s favorite filmmaker.

Death Camp Dispute

07/11/2003
Staff Writer
How best to honor the memory of half a million Jews buried in the horrific and long-neglected Belzec death camp in southeastern Poland? That's the heart of a running dispute pitting several rabbis and Jewish organizations that support the approved design plan against New York activist Rabbi Avi Weiss, who insists the plan desecrates the victims and violates Jewish law. The dispute echoes the debate in New York City over the memorial for the Sept. 11 World Trade Center victims.

Selective Memory?

05/05/2000
Staff Writer
William Donat stood at the podium in the dimly lit main sanctuary of Congregation Emanu-El and peered out at the 2,500 solemn faces sitting in the pews. "As I look out at the audience this Yom HaShoah [Holocaust Remembrance Day], I see fewer survivors out there," noted Donat, a child of Holocaust survivor and author Alexander Donat. "Time is taking its toll. And it is fair to ask what shall be when all the adult survivors are gone?" The answer could be found all around Donat, a child survivor of the Warsaw ghetto.

Museum Mess

01/24/1998

Eric J. Greenberg is a staff writer. James D. Besser is the Washington correspondent.
Washington — Since its opening in 1993, the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum here has tried to position itself as a respected national institution, not an instrument of Jewish politics. But this week it became ensnared in just what it hoped to avoid when its top lay and professional leaders spurned an administration request for an official welcome for Palestinian leader Yasir Arafat during his trip to Washington.
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