Brooklyn Museum

Ancient Egypt In Brooklyn

03/24/2010

Sculptures and mirrors, coffins and sarcophagi lids are some of the artifacts of daily life — and death — that shaped the existence of the Jews in ancient Egypt, the freed slaves that seders around the Jewish world remember at Passover each year.

For many members of the Jewish community, preparation for the holiday begins weeks before Pesach, in shopping and cooking and attending lectures.

Some creative New Yorkers had the chance to prepare this spring a few stops from a No. 2 or 3 subway exit in central Brooklyn.

Photo By Michael Datikash

Symphony’s New Space

04/05/2002

The surplus capital of the indefatigable 1990s economy may be a memory, but its effects are still being felt in the ongoing expansion of many of New York’s cultural centers, from Jazz at Lincoln Center to the Brooklyn Museum.

Now this trend has reached all the way to West 95th Street. Symphony Space, once housed in an intimate but sticky-floored former skating rink, has recently completed a $12 million renovation. After a nearly two-year closure, the beloved performing arts group officially reopens April 8.

On The Road Again, In The Diaspora

10/03/2003
Staff Writer
In "A Jew is Not One Thing," a film at the end of The Jewish Museum's permanent exhibition, a group of American, Israeli and European Jews (a rabbi, an educator, a psychologist, artists, scholars and even day school students) comment on themes that have shaped the Jewish people.  

The View From Inside

03/14/2003
Staff Writer
For those who were spared the horrors of the Holocaust, the events that made up the Nazis' Final Solution persist as a collage of black-and-white images: documentary photographs taken by the Nazis to record their horrific achievements or film footage taken by the Allies as evidence of the tragedy they encountered at liberation. Even Steven Spielberg's cinematic rendering, "Schindler's List," preserved the duotone palette of historical Holocaust memory.

Symphony’s New Space

04/05/2002
Staff Writer
The surplus capital of the indefatigable 1990s economy may be a memory, but its effects are still being felt in the ongoing expansion of many of New York’s cultural centers, from Jazz at Lincoln Center to the Brooklyn Museum. Now this trend has reached all the way to West 95th Street. Symphony Space, once housed in an intimate but sticky-floored former skating rink, has recently completed a $12 million renovation. After a nearly two-year closure, the beloved performing arts group officially reopens April 8.

Jews Step Into ‘Dung’ Wars

10/01/1999
Staff Writer
Next time, it could be a Sefer Torah with elephant dung dabbed on it. That vision is what the head of the Union of Orthodox Jewish Congregations says motivated him to denounce the “Sensation” exhibit at the Brooklyn Museum of Art this week and, as he said in a press release, “support those civic leaders who have questioned whether public funds should support this exhibition.”

New Voice For The Voiceless

01/07/2000
Staff Writer
With the New York Police Department facing mounting criticism following the brutal attack on Abner Louima and the fatal shooting of Amadou Diallo, a diverse group of city religious leaders came together last year to express their concern to city government officials.

No Singular 'Sensation'

10/15/1999
Staff Writer
As the "Sensation" storm raged last month, the fact that a Catholic mayor was accusing the Brooklyn Museum's Jewish director of promoting Catholic bashing was noted but not highlighted. Now with the controversy being decided in Manhattan Federal Court, Jewish involvement in the affair is being scrutinized further, even as it becomes clearer that the city's Jewish community has split along political lines.
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