Switzerland

For Israeli Arabs and Jews, Soccer Puts Identity Politics In Play

Cultural tensions and overlaps on view in World Cup rooting interests.

06/29/2010
Israel Correspondent

Tel Aviv — At World Cup time, soccer fever is hailed as a cosmopolitan common denominator.

A café in the central square in Nazareth, is adorned with flags of World Cup favorites. Right, fans watch a match at Tel Aviv.

Almost Everything Is Illuminated

Yeshiva University Museum exhibit features a dazzling array
of mostly hand-written Hebrew books.

03/18/2010

About six years ago, the curator Sharon L. Mintz was looking for rare printed Talmuds for an exhibit she was organizing at the Yeshiva University Museum. She came across the name of a little-known collector in Switzerland who said he could help. Mintz was flown out to the private home of the collector, but discovered that he had much more than Talmuds.
 

The new exhibit is devoted to the collection of rare Hebrew books held by Rene Braginsky

Eight For ‘07

01/02/2008
Special To The Jewish Week

At the risk of sounding like Walter Cronkite, what kind of a year has it been in Jewish music? You wouldn’t know it from this annual compilation of five-star records — there are only eight this year, the fewest in the decade I’ve been doing this — but it’s been a very good year.

A Litmus Test For Zionism?

01/22/2010
Special To The Jewish Week

George Orwell, perhaps better than any other writer, was able to capture the danger of political groups redefining common terms in a way meant to confuse and eventually neutralize opponents. In his famous novel, “1984,” he shows how a totalitarian regime (in this case the Soviet Union) declares to its citizens that freedom is slavery and war is peace. Repeated often enough the citizenry begins to repeat these phrases in a zombie-like way, and in essence accepts these absurd slogans.

A Plea For The MIAs

07/19/2002
Staff Writer
Uri Tannenbaum hasn't seen or talked to his father in nearly two years. Last week, he tried to get a message to his dad the only way he can: through the media. "Dad, you must know you're with us. We love you. We miss you," Uri said, not knowing for sure whether Elchanan Tannenbaum will ever hear his words: or if he's even still alive.

Honoring A Heroine Of The Shoah

08/25/2006
Staff Writer
Clara Baer was 19 when the Nazis invaded Budapest in 1944, bringing the Final Solution to Hungary. She joined her parents, devout Catholics, in rescuing Jews, giving them refuge in the family’s home and a nearby textile factory. She was 81 when Israel honored her for her heroism last week.

The Forgotten Olympians

08/06/2004
Staff Writer
In Olympic years, some People of the Book become people of the backstroke, the clean-and-jerk, and the high hurdles. The Games, Summer and Winter, serve as a showcase for the best athletes, Jewish and non-Jewish. From A (Ruth Abeles) to Z (Eli Zuckerman), names like Mark Spitz and Kerry Strug are in the record books as well as Jewish history texts. Beginning with 10 medals won by Jewish athletes at the first modern Olympics in Athens in 1896, Jews have been a steady presence at the international competition.

Still Out In The Cold

02/08/2002
Staff Writer
Yossi Goldberg played soccer and basketball as a boy growing up in Israel, but figure skating was in his blood — his mother was a figure skater in Lithuania. That, says Goldberg, founder and president of the Israeli Figure Skating Association, is why he has devoted a dozen years to a winter sport in a Mediterranean country.

'Delayed Justice'

12/17/1999
Staff Writer
Under a $5.14 billion settlement reached Tuesday with Germany, Nazi slave laborers are expected to receive a one-time payment of about $10,000 in as early as six months, according to an attorney for many of the Jewish victims. The settlement was reached after yearlong talks between the German government and German industry, and Jewish groups and victims' lawyers.
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