Palestine

Present At The Creation

10/11/2007
Special To The Jewish Week

It is a commonplace notion that historical fictions are not about the period in which they are set but, rather, the period in which they are created. Elie Chouraqui’s new film, “O Jerusalem,” which opens Oct. 17, is a case in point.

The Hero Of An Israeli Best Seller

09/20/2007
Special To The Jewish Week

When Ram Oren, the Israeli author likened by much of his country to John Grisham, learned of Michael Stolowitzky’s story, he was faced with a choice: He could turn the tale into a work of fiction, like 17 of his previous 20 books, or treat it as history.

But Oren found the choice surprisingly easy.

Raising Their Voices

03/01/2002
Special to The Jewish Week

 

Nearly 100 supporters of Israel’s ultra-dovish Women In Black movement stood silently last Thursday night on a narrow sidewalk at the south end of Union Square holding up signs with legends like “End The Occupation” “End The Violence” and “Two States — Israel and Palestine.”

Yiddish Theater’s Last Leading Lady

At 98, Mina Bern was one of the few remaining stars from Second Avenue’s heyday.

01/22/2010
Special To The Jewish Week

She was one of the last supports of a world that was crumbling to pieces.

When Mina Bern died of heart failure last week at the age of 98, the Yiddish theater world mourned one of its leading lights, an indefatigable performer and champion of the Yiddish language whose career spanned three continents and virtually the whole of the 20th century.

Mina Bern was remembered this week for her indomitable will and star power.

A Rich Brew Of Ideas

Long before Starbucks, or even Tel Aviv, cafés played a key role in fostering (and caffeinating) Jewish literary and intellectual communities.

04/03/2009
At the turn of the 20th century, the presence of acculturated Jews in the renowned literary and artistic Viennese cafés was so pronounced that a proverb claiming that “the Jew belongs in the coffeehouse” was widely circulated in the city. Today, a hundred years later, the city of Tel Aviv can lay claim not only to serving some of the best coffee available anywhere, but also to fostering and sustaining a thriving café culture; a culture with heritage that goes back to the 1930s and the immigrants who came from cities like Vienna, Berlin and Warsaw.

Ghosts And Giants

Jerusalem’s Emek Refaim is haunted by Christian millenarians, North African immigrants, British polo players – even the grand mufti. Today, you’re more likely to find a yeshiva boy or yuppie

03/06/2009
Among visitors from the Old Country, Emek Refaim in the German Colony is the second-best known street in Jerusalem after Ben-Yehuda. The latter, where you buy mezuzahs and gorge on falafel, is named for a fabled fanatic who helped revive the Hebrew language. Emek Refaim, a three-minute walk from my house, goes back to the Hebrew Bible, and means either “Valley of the Giants” or “Valley of the Ghosts.”  According to the First Book of Chronicles, David fought the Philistines here. I count them, too, as neighbors.

Ghosts And Giants

Jerusalem’s Emek Refaim is haunted by Christian millenarians, North African immigrants, British polo players – even the grand mufti. Today, you’re more likely to find a yeshiva boy or yuppie

03/06/2009
Among visitors from the Old Country, Emek Refaim in the German Colony is the second-best known street in Jerusalem after Ben-Yehuda. The latter, where you buy mezuzahs and gorge on falafel, is named for a fabled fanatic who helped revive the Hebrew language. Emek Refaim, a three-minute walk from my house, goes back to the Hebrew Bible, and means either “Valley of the Giants” or “Valley of the Ghosts.”  According to the First Book of Chronicles, David fought the Philistines here. I count them, too, as neighbors.
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